Major and Minor -- Turning Scales into Solos

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garnold
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Major and Minor -- Turning Scales into Solos

Post by garnold » February 2nd, 2010, 4:36 am

In the lesson http://www.guitarnoise.com/lessons/turn ... os-part-3/ you state at the end that if you want to make a solo sound more "blues like" you can use the minor version of the major pent scale with the blues notes. From what I have learned (and from what I read on your site) you would use the relative minor scale so C major pent = A minor pent. Your root note for the C major pent scale is the C and your root note for the C minor is the A so that is why I'm a bit confused why you would call it the C minor pent scale? It's not, it's the A minor pent scale (C's relative minor). The C minor pent scale would be completely different and would be played when your jamming to a Eb major scale (Eb's relative minor would be C correct?).

I'm new to the theory part here so please help me get on track here so I understand your thinking. Your site is a huge help to me and I have been studying it now for sometime and learning a lot :)

Fretsource
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Re: Major and Minor -- Turning Scales into Solos

Post by Fretsource » February 2nd, 2010, 5:27 am

garnold wrote:In the lesson http://www.guitarnoise.com/lessons/turn ... os-part-3/ you state at the end that if you want to make a solo sound more "blues like" you can use the minor version of the major pent scale with the blues notes. From what I have learned (and from what I read on your site) you would use the relative minor scale so C major pent = A minor pent. Your root note for the C major pent scale is the C and your root note for the C minor is the A so that is why I'm a bit confused why you would call it the C minor pent scale? It's not, it's the A minor pent scale (C's relative minor). The C minor pent scale would be completely different and would be played when your jamming to a Eb major scale (Eb's relative minor would be C correct?).

I'm new to the theory part here so please help me get on track here so I understand your thinking. Your site is a huge help to me and I have been studying it now for sometime and learning a lot :)
No - it doesn't mean use the A minor pentatonic. Instead, you'd use the C minor pentatonic over a C major blues. It's the clash of those notes (such as the Eb of the scale against the E of the C7 chord) that gives it a distinct bluesy sound.
If you used A minor pentatonic, you wouldn't hear any difference from C major pentatonic as all the notes of A minor pentatonic are exactly the same as C major pentatonic. You'd be introducing nothing new to the mix and wouldn't get the bluesy sound that C minor pentatonic would give you.

garnold
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Joined: February 2nd, 2010, 4:29 am

Re: Major and Minor -- Turning Scales into Solos

Post by garnold » February 2nd, 2010, 6:51 am

Ah nice I just messed around with that and it sounds sweet! Thanks man.

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