Difference between a minor and a major

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verminisjk
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Difference between a minor and a major

Post by verminisjk » February 29th, 2008, 7:28 am

Hello

I'm new to music theory, and I've been reading some articles on guitar noise, and I can't find an explanation on the difference between Minor and Major (I understand the difference in Chord (I minorIII IV and I III IV i think) but I have absolutely no clue of the difference between a minor and a major scale) I'd like some enlightment or a link to a lesson that explains it all

Thanks a lot

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Riff Raff
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Re: Difference between a minor and a major

Post by Riff Raff » February 29th, 2008, 8:01 am


verminisjk
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Re: Difference between a minor and a major

Post by verminisjk » February 29th, 2008, 8:40 am

Hi

Thanks for the reply

I just want to be sure
A major Scale is: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7///Root, Whole Step, WS, HS, WS, WS, WS, HS
So a minor scale is: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 /// Root, WS, HS, WH, WH, HS, WH, WH

So, let's say, a Em scale would be:
E, F#, G, A, B, C, D, E?


Thanks

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georgejw22
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Re: Difference between a minor and a major

Post by georgejw22 » February 29th, 2008, 8:46 am

That's right and another way to look at is a minor scale is the same as a major scale with a flatten 3rd and 6th.
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verminisjk
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Re: Difference between a minor and a major

Post by verminisjk » February 29th, 2008, 8:53 am

Thanks for the reply

So scales are just an arrangement or pattern of intervals?

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Ignar Hillström
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Re: Difference between a minor and a major

Post by Ignar Hillström » March 1st, 2008, 4:20 pm

Yup. Western music has twelve notes, and those scales that contain seven of them with each 'step' being either one or two semites is called a diatonic scale. There are seven of them, the first (Ionian or Major) and the sixth (Aeolian or Minor) being the most common ones. If the third note of a scale is five semitones higher then the first note it will sound sad (minor), if it is six semitones higher it's more upbeat and happy sounding (major). There are multiple different minor scales but they all have the 'minor third' note in common.
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spides
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Re: Difference between a minor and a major

Post by spides » May 24th, 2008, 6:35 pm

georgejw22 wrote:That's right and another way to look at is a minor scale is the same as a major scale with a flatten 3rd and 6th.
Close. That is harmonic minor, whilst more common than natural minor (aeolian) in classical and metal music, it is an altered minor. Natural minor also has a flat 7th. Though harmonic minor is still a scale in its own right, and quite a useful one. There is also melodic minor which has two variations, traditional melodic minor has a major 6 and 7th going up, and a minor 6 and 7th going down. Jazz melodic minor keeps the raised 6th and seventh up and down.
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