D chord

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Yaroslav Bulatov

D chord

Post by Yaroslav Bulatov » February 24th, 2004, 2:01 pm

I was reading pages on chord construction and surmised that major chords always have 3 tones. However, D chord seems to have 4 tones (E,A,D,F#) Is there a reason for exception?

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Re: D chord

Post by markyesme » February 24th, 2004, 2:13 pm

E doesn't belong.  It should only be D, A, D, F#:

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Re: D chord

Post by Alex_ » February 24th, 2004, 3:34 pm

that would be Dadd9..

a lot of chords have extensions on them but are only summarised as a D chord, a lot of people are lasy when writing up the names.


not to be picky but, it will help you understand better, when reffering to notes its usually in intervals between the notes..

like the interval of D and F# is a major interval, which is two tones

A chord has 3 notes, and they are all an amount of tones/semi-tones away from each other.

So if you see an article that mentions tones i just wanted to clear up that those arent mistaken as notes.

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Re: D chord

Post by corbind » February 24th, 2004, 4:04 pm

Rather than D add 9 wouldn't Dsus2 be more apt?  It really is suspending the F# or F (D major or D minor 3rd).  It is amazing the number of names we can come up with to define a chord in different situations.
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Re: D chord

Post by NoteBoat » February 24th, 2004, 6:10 pm

Different situations is exactly right... for example, a m7b5 chord can be considered half diminished, depending on how it resolves.  But I digress...

One problem that many guitarists have in terms of theory is that you learn a fingering, and associate a name with it... and keep that name no matter what the context is.  Example:

C-E-G-A

Now, if you learned that as a C6 chord, you probably always call that fingering a C6, no matter where you see it.  On the other hand,

A-C-E-G

is quite clearly Am7.

Context in a piece of music is what determines the name of a chord.  You'll see mis-named chords in charts fairly often, because the copyist is either a) uneducated or b) lazy (maybe even c, both of the above!)

A chord with D-F#-A-E would most likely be called Dadd9.  Current convention wouldn't name it a suspended chord, because the 3rd (F#) appears.

Depending on the context, you can come up with alternate names... what if A is the root?  Then the chord is A-D-E-F#... the 1-4-5-6 in the key of A.  If it resolves to A6, you could make a case for calling the same fingering Asus6 (suspended because the 4th replaces the 3rd in the chord).

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Re: D chord

Post by corbind » February 25th, 2004, 9:27 am

Hey Tom, that's too weird a D6 = Am7.  I have to laugh because you are absolutely right.

Dsus2   (d-e-a)

1e: --0—(e)--
2B: --3—(d)--ring
3G: --2—(a)--index
4D: --0—(d)--
5A: --X—--  
6E: --X—--  

I would want to call the chord above a Dsus2 every time I played it in that position no matter the key or what it resolves to.  Why?  Human nature.  I have a buddies named John, Joe, Jim, Frank, etc. and I generally call them by their name.  I would have a hard time calling them something different since I know them by that name.  See what I mean?

Yea, theory is the coolest.  It is like a huge mud pit.  You play in it then rinse and repeat until you can jump into it just like a swimming pool without drowning.  Let me go wash that mud off my shoe.   ;)
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Re: D chord

Post by hbriem » February 26th, 2004, 4:48 am

[quote author=corbind link=board=theory;num=1077652939;start=0#5 date=02/25/04 at 09:27:49]Hey Tom, that's too weird a D6 = Am7.  [/quote]

No, C6 = Am7.
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Re: D chord

Post by Alex_ » February 26th, 2004, 1:54 pm

Rather than D add 9 wouldn't Dsus2 be more apt?
even if a third is in a chord, neither adding a second or a fourth would make it suspended, right?

because thats just like looking at add9/11 chord then, am i right?

plus there is nothing really to suspend. i suppose there could be a heavier sound closer to the root of the chord and might sound nice when its released. (say on a piano and the second note is the key right next to the root, so there are 3 keys aligned, pressed down with a fifth added)
but even that heavy sound wouldnt count as a suspension, would it?
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Re: D chord

Post by argus » February 27th, 2004, 6:03 am

It's only a sus2/4 if there's no third. Otherwise it's an add9/11.

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Re: D chord

Post by Alex_ » February 29th, 2004, 3:25 pm

ahh so i was right...


BUT

if you have a third and a 2nd/4th then there is a lot more "tension" either closer to the root (2nd added) or the 5th (4th added)

in that case there isnt a suspension, but more of a weight in sound that is unbalanced

what (in a musical term) would that 'weight' be called?
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Re: D chord

Post by Alan Green » February 29th, 2004, 4:28 pm

It's called a dissonance, Alex, and they all want to resolve somewhere.


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Re: D chord

Post by Alex_ » February 29th, 2004, 5:19 pm

they 'all' want to resolve somewhere??

im talking about playing a chord and either adding a 2nd or a 4th, and having a weight in the chord.

i dont know what you are reffering to in the plural :S
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