SSG Year 14 Week 16

The Sunday Songwriters club is a stretching exercise for your mind. Arpeggios for the brain cells, so to speak. After all, writing is like playing - to get better, you have to practice.
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dhodge
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SSG Year 14 Week 16

Post by dhodge » February 13th, 2016, 5:24 pm

Hello to all

This week you get to write about any topic you'd like in any style of song you'd like. There is (of course) a stipulation, but this week it's a musical one: Your song must be in a major key and it cannot have a "V" chord. What this means is that if your song is in the key of C, you can't use any G chords. This includes Gsus, G7, G9, or any sorts of G minor, G diminished, or G augmented.

So, if your song is in C, there are no G chords.

If your song is in C#, there are no G# chords.

If your song is in D, there are no A chords.

If your song is in Eb, there are no Bb chords.

If your song is in E, there are no B chords.

If your song is in F, there are no C chords.

If your song is in F#, there are no C# chords.

If your song is in G, there are no D chords.

If your song is in Ab, there are no Eb chords.

If your song is in A, there are no E chords.

If your song is in Bb, there are no F chords.

And (finally!), if your song is in B, there are no F# chords.

Before you think this is impossible, have a listen to songs like Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" (just C and F), or "Hey Eugene" by Pink Maritini (A, B, and D) or Til Tuesday's "Coming Up Close" (in Ab but not a single Eb chord). Writing without a V chord isn't impossible, it just means you're going to have to make different chord choices than you might normally do.

As always, I look forward to reading and to listening to what you come up with.

Peace

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