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jeremyd
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hmm

Post by jeremyd » August 16th, 2006, 3:34 pm

what does the # in something such as A#..

Ghost
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Post by Ghost » August 16th, 2006, 3:42 pm

# means sharp, so A# is A sharp.
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Elecktrablue
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Post by Elecktrablue » August 16th, 2006, 4:16 pm

And ... while we're on the subject of sharps, there are also flats. Written in ASCII they look like this:

Ab
Cb
Db
Gb
..· ´¨¨)) -:¦:-
¸.·´ .·´¨¨))
((¸¸.·´ .·´
-:¦:- ((¸¸.·´ -:¦:- Elecktrablue -:¦:-

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margaret
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Post by margaret » August 16th, 2006, 4:22 pm

You may already know "the rest of the story", but in case you (or other readers) don't:

A "sharp" (#) is one-half step higher in tone (one fret higher) than the named note.

A "flat" (symbolized on-screen with a lower-case "b" since the keyboard doesn't have the exact symbol) is one-half step lower in tone (one fret lower) than the named note.

Thus, A# (A sharp) is the same exact sound/tone as Bb (B flat). The key signature of a particular song will determine whether that tone is notated as A# or Bb.

Did I explain that correctly?

Margaret
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And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~

Dagwood
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Post by Dagwood » August 16th, 2006, 4:31 pm

Margaret...I think so :)


Also if you have troubles remembering if the # is Sharp and the b is Flat.

When I look at the A# notation, I think of the # as having teeth (Visualy)...sharp teeth.
Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing. - Wernher Von Braun (1912-1977)

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GM
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Post by GM » August 18th, 2006, 11:05 am

I end up forgetting which side of a note sharp and flat lie. So the way I remember is an old Simpsons episode where Homer et al. name their band the "B Sharps" which would just be a C because it's only a half step from B to C.

As a school teacher, it's embarrassing and enlightening to see a lame joke do a better job than logic for me to learn something.

ColoradoFenderBender
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Post by ColoradoFenderBender » August 18th, 2006, 11:32 am

Your explanation is correct, Margaret. Good job.

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Post by greybeard » August 18th, 2006, 11:32 am

GM wrote:As a school teacher, it's embarrassing and enlightening to see a lame joke do a better job than logic for me to learn something.
There is a learning system, where you remember things, by attaching them to silly (but rememberable) ideas. Associating the silly idea to the original idea to be learnt, results in a chain of thought, that brings up the real answer. You can also use this system to link any number of items together, such as a long shopping list, just by creating a story line that develops one silly idea into the next.
It's called the Peg System.
I learned all the counties in England, by size, in about 20 minutes (it was my first attempt at the system), but weeks later, I could still recite the list.
I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
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The Dali
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Post by The Dali » August 18th, 2006, 12:26 pm

Yeah, and the interesting point is that the sharps/flats on a piano are all the black keys. Guitar is a little different because you can't easily identify a sharp or flat note on the fretboard because they all look the same! And if you notice on a piano, there is not a black key between every two white keys... that is because all the notes have a half-step between them except for B->C and E->F. So...


A A#(Bb) B C C#(Db) D D#(Eb) E F F#(Gb) G G#(Ab)

To learn the fretboard, you can checkout [/url]www.fretboardwarrior.com.

-=- Steve

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Post by Misanthrope » August 18th, 2006, 2:09 pm

greybeard wrote:There is a learning system, where you remember things, by attaching them to silly (but rememberable) ideas. Associating the silly idea to the original idea to be learnt, results in a chain of thought, that brings up the real answer. You can also use this system to link any number of items together, such as a long shopping list, just by creating a story line that develops one silly idea into the next.
It's called the Peg System.
I'm never sure if I've spelled rhythm properly until I've said "Rolf Harris, you terribly hairy man" in my head. :mrgreen:

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Post by guitarteacher » August 19th, 2006, 4:15 pm

greybeard wrote:
GM wrote: I learned all the counties in England, by size, in about 20 minutes (it was my first attempt at the system), but weeks later, I could still recite the list.
So, what are they?!

(And now back to the topic at hand)
If you want to be good, practice. If you want to be great, you must constantly change the way you think.

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Post by greybeard » August 19th, 2006, 11:12 pm

So, what are they?!

(And now back to the topic at hand)[/quote]
It was never any use, so I allowed my brain to use the space for something more useful, like music theory. 8) 8)
I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
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