Tenor guitar, nylon strings

Post your question here and an experienced guitar player or teacher will get back to you.
Post Reply
ReggieB
newbie
Posts: 2
Joined: April 20th, 2014, 1:55 pm

Tenor guitar, nylon strings

Post by ReggieB » April 20th, 2014, 2:16 pm

I am new here, so I hope this is not a foolish question.

I am a mandolin player and recently decided I'd like to try playing nylon strings, so I strung a ukulele with nylon strings tuned in fifths. It has become my favorite instrument, great for Celtic. Only trouble is that the body is smaller than I'd like.

Question: are there 4 nylon string guitars tuned in fifths? Maybe nylon string tenor guitar or a 4 string classical that can be tuned in fifths? Are strings available?

Your experience is appreciated.

User avatar
Alan Green
Guitari Lama
Posts: 7948
Joined: September 23rd, 2002, 1:35 am
Location: Little Cambridge, Essex, UK
Contact:

Re: Tenor guitar, nylon strings

Post by Alan Green » April 20th, 2014, 10:02 pm

I've never come across them.

That's not to say you can't experiment with a regular nylon string guitar - take off the highest and lowest strings and see what you can achieve - tune the lowest string to G, the next will stay at D, tune the G up to A and replace what is now the highest string with the high string you took off and tune it back up to the E it's built for and there you have it.

Don't spend a lot of money at the start - charity shop guitars make ideal experiment material because you're not paying full price. Don't get a steel string guitar and try to replace the strings with nylon, though - you won't hear anything.
"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger
"I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk

Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk

ReggieB
newbie
Posts: 2
Joined: April 20th, 2014, 1:55 pm

Re: Tenor guitar, nylon strings

Post by ReggieB » April 21st, 2014, 4:28 am

Alan:

Thank you for the reply.

I was hoping that there was an Irish or Peruvian or some other kind of guitar variant that would fit the bill. But experimenting is not a bad thing - I'll probably learn something. I appreciate the suggestion.

Best,

Reggie B.

Post Reply