caged system

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scottdzd
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Joined: December 14th, 2017, 4:57 am

caged system

Post by scottdzd » December 14th, 2017, 5:03 am

Hi everyone , dose anybody know a free version of Caged system trick books , i feel like there are a lot of things to know and shapes and easy ways to play guitar , and its all about the shapes , i understood the concept of the caged system , i have fretboard freedom but , i need to know what i should do exactelly after i figured out the fretboard freedom , what i should do next anyone advice me 'id be greatful thank you.

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Musicus
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Posts: 31
Joined: November 22nd, 2017, 10:52 am
Location: Nashville TN

Re: caged system

Post by Musicus » December 18th, 2017, 2:17 pm

Big question. CAGED is just one tool. I won't debate its pros and cons here, but I think you might want to consider moving on at some point. This is a site that has some of the cons on it. https://tomhess.net/WhyTheCAGEDSystemHu ... aying.aspx(disclaimer: this is not my site, and I don't necessarily agree with all of it). I teach CAGED, but I only spend maybe 2 hours on it. I see it as a door (but not the only door) to a house full of techniques and studies. This may be where your tricks are. There seem to be quite a few Youtube videos on CAGED.

So this leaves where to go from here, if you are so inclined to explore, and there is mega-stuff out there (much of which is a total waste of time). It kinda depends on what styles you want to play, and where, like just for fun, garage band stuff, local venues, weddings and parties, P&W, professional touring, studio gigs, teaching, whatever.

I'm not really sure what you mean by "fretboard freedom", so maybe some homework on musical terms is in order too. Communications between musicians is part of Musicianship. Lots of gtr teachers push the Liturgical modes (Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, etc.), which doesn't fair well imho with CAGED, but it's another way to look at scales. Reading music (including sight reading) is something I insist on when I teach, especially if a student is planning to go pro, so that's an area to consider diving into also, if you haven't already. Music notation is a must to move into the really good stuff, melody/harmony relationships, chord theory, etc.

So how long have you been playing and what are your goals?
"Well, I hope the neighbors like THIS song!"

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