3 Comments

  1. richard
    Dec 15, 2012 @ 19:20:09

    With respect, this information is not helpful. The problem of missing a change, or losing the ‘one’, or accidentally adding/skipping a beat is not addressed by the material you present as a solution. The problem lies with keeping one’s place in the musical form. Your material talks about measures, beats and subdivisions, and is really aimed at learning to keep a steady tempo — but it doesn’t touch at all on how to avoid losing one’s place in a performance. Most people are able to feel the pulse of the music but many suffer from losing the one or losing the form. The required skill goes far beyond counting, and sub-division — the problem is not related to tempo — it requires using part of the brain to perform and somehow having a simultaneous parallel process keep your place ‘on the map’ — or in the musical form. I say ‘somehow’ because it is clear that different people have different ways of achieving this. Problem is, you haven’t even recognised the problem, let alone addressed it…

    Reply

  2. bill (england)
    Sep 03, 2013 @ 17:42:04

    i have found the above info very useful,as far as it goes. my prob.is not being able to count during soloing. i am maybe concentrating on trying to do a good solo. have tried playing less per bar. what is the answer for this? i can play well enough for the chords/comping, broken rhythms etc. i am fairly new to jazz impro, (tho’ not guitar playing)..be interested in any idea’s.
    regards

    Reply

  3. SYED
    Oct 10, 2013 @ 13:04:52

    I found this lesson to be extremely useful. Thank you very much Tom. Even though I have played the guitar for many years, my rhythm is far from perfect. Lately I have been trying hard to get it right. At the stage where I am, there could not have been a better lesson than this for me. I was having a lot of trouble figuring out triplets, but now it sounds so easy- and natural. Thanks again, and good luck.

    Reply

Leave a Reply