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Neck transplant..


(@k5koy)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 45
Topic starter  

I have a Warwick Corvette 4 string with a severe Twisted neck. I took it to my guitar guy to see if it could be repaired. He thought possible, but didnt think it would be permanent due to the severity. We have decided a replacement was a much better idea so he is currently in the process of making me a new neck. The old one is Ovingkol with Wenge fretboard all on a bubinga body, and produces that signature "Growling" tone that Warwicks have. In looking for various billets for the new neck, my friend came across a really nice looking piece of American Ash. It has been air dried for about 28 years and looks great. As hard as it is, and due to the aging process, he said this would be a great bass neck. I kind of agree, but my question is this. How much will it change the tone? He didnt think it would make a significant change. But I believe it will tend to brighten that growl up a bit. Anyone have experience with changing neck woods?
Thanks!

Koy Carson
West Texas

**60th Anniversary American Strat
**Carvin AC175 Thinline Acoustic
**Ibanez EW20ZW Electric/Acoustic
**Arbor AJ145CR Jazz
**Fender Marcus Miller 5 String Bass
**Fender Geddy Lee Signature Bass
**Warwick Corvette 4 string Bass (Currently getting neck Transplant)
**Tradition Fretless Bass
**Takamine Hollow body Bass

http://www.myspace.com/k5koy


The "PickPocket" The ORIGINAL Guitar Accessory
http://www.waxpatterns.com/customguitarpick.htm


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(@nicktorres)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 5468
 

This is one of those a guitar is more than the sum of it's parts type of question. I wouldn't worry about it. I have no scientific basis for the following, but I'd rank tone influencing factors like this:

Your fingers
or your type of pick
your effects chain
your amp
the position of your amp in relation to the listener
the settings on your amp
the room you are playing in
what pickups you have
the tone settings on your bass
what type of strings
how old are your strings
what type of bridge/saddle
type of body wood
type of fretboard wood
your current mood
current atmospheric conditions
moon phase
type of neck wood

Even if it changes the tone a smidge, it will play better than it does now.

You may have heard one or two quotes attributed to me if you've been here long enough, "The magic is in your fingers" or "Don't be caught with a $3000 guitar and $300 fingers". I know your question is genuine and obviously of concern to you, but however the guitar comes out, you will be able to make the most beautiful music with it because......wait for it......the magic is in your fingers.


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(@slejhamer)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 3297
 

As Nick said there are many other factors.

Fingerboard wood will have more impact than the back of the neck, most likely. I'd think a rosewood fingerboard would tame any excessive highs. But we're talking parsley compared to the body's salt-and-pepper flavoring.

This is what MTD says about neck woods including ash:
A wenge neck and board add compression and focus to the speaking voice of the bass. A maple neck and rosewood board is more open and slightly warmer than a maple neck and maple board. Ebony on maple is very quick in its response with lots of snap. I have been trying ash as a neck material and found it to be leaning towards wenge but more open.

I'm curious how will it be finished - do you want the baseball-bat feel of ash, or will it be filled and smoothed out?

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


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(@nicktorres)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 5468
 

that is a good way of putting it, parsley to the body's salt and pepper, with the pickups being the meat and the strings being the potatoes and the amp a nice chianti and the audience dessert - at least that's how Dr. Lecter explained it to me.


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(@k5koy)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 45
Topic starter  

I'm curious how will it be finished - do you want the baseball-bat feel of ash, or will it be filled and smoothed out?
Im not sure what you mean by filled & smoothed out, but it will be smooth but no finish really, just the natual wood..

Koy Carson
West Texas

**60th Anniversary American Strat
**Carvin AC175 Thinline Acoustic
**Ibanez EW20ZW Electric/Acoustic
**Arbor AJ145CR Jazz
**Fender Marcus Miller 5 String Bass
**Fender Geddy Lee Signature Bass
**Warwick Corvette 4 string Bass
**Tradition Fretless Bass
**Takamine Hollow body Bass

http://www.myspace.com/k5koy


The "PickPocket" The ORIGINAL Guitar Accessory
http://www.waxpatterns.com/customguitarpick.htm


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(@slejhamer)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 3297
 

Im not sure what you mean by filled & smoothed out, but it will be smooth but no finish really, just the natual wood..

Ash, even hard ash, has a fairly open grain. Go pick up an ash baseball bat and you'll see.

A grain filler will make it level and smooth, and you'll want to put some kind of finish over that for protection (I'd use gunstock oil - durable and easy to recoat if needed, and still looks/feels "natural" a silky smooth way.)

Otherwise it may soak up all your sweat and get fugly. Mahogany necks will rot if not finished. Not sure about ash, but I wouldn't want to take the risk.
that is a good way of putting it, parsley to the body's salt and pepper, with the pickups being the meat and the strings being the potatoes and the amp a nice chianti and the audience dessert - at least that's how Dr. Lecter explained it to me.

Nick, what's for thanksgiving dinner? Maybe we don't want to know ...

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


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