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A-Shaped Barre Chord Fingering Question

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(@robbie)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 456
 

Hey Dogbite no problemo but the A "Shape" barre cord he is trying to play is say the B at the second fret or D at the 5th fret. I play these with my ring finger mini barring the A shape two frets higher than the root note. I have seen where others more knowledgeable have also suggested barring the root and then playing the chord using the middle ,ring and pinkie but I guess I find the other way so easy that I find it hard to change. I think Alan Green is one who says that you limit your ability to fret other chords while using the mini barre instead of fretting the A with your remaining fingers. Sorry Alan if this is the wrong info.
Robbie


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(@guitarteacher)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 46
 

OK, I sure someone more experienced than I can state this better, but here goes:

Open A Chord: xx222x

A Shaped Barre Chord: Root Note on the 5th String - movable up the fretboard
Example: x5777x (i.e. a "D" Chord in Barre Form)

E Shaped Barre Chord: Root Note on the 6th String - movable up the fretboard
Example: 577655 (i.e. an "A" Chord in Barre Form)

Dogbite, I think you're talking about the first example. My questions related to the second example. And we've all danced around the third example.

It is a wonder we can ever keep this stuff straight! Thanks again to all for the responses and the guidance.

I would modify your "A Shaped Bar Chord" to include the chord tone on the first string as so:

x57775

An otherwise excellent clarification.

GT

If you want to be good, practice. If you want to be great, you must constantly change the way you think.


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(@matteo)
Honorable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 557
 

i guess that A-shaped bar chord are my biggest enemy! I mean i tried to plat them both ways:

a) barring string 5 to 1 with index and 2-4 with ring
b) barring string 5 to 1 with index and fretting with ring, middle and pinky fingers the 2-4 strings

they all sound no so good, particullary if I cchange from a E-shaped barre chord...ultimately I decided to fret 4th string with index and the first three strings with middle, ring, pinky (and strum only the first four strings)...that's the only way i obtain a clean sound for B chord!

Matteo


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(@bobblehat)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 309
 

For a D major for example I use my index finger for the main barre and then ring finger on the D string and mini barre with my pinky on the G+B strings.

that way if you you want to change to say an A major barre chord you dont need to change your finger positions too much because your middle finger is already free. eg just move your hand up one string and plonk your middle finger down.

perhaps I'm just weird.

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(@dcmarshall)
Eminent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 41
Topic starter  

That's interesting, Bobblehat, because one of the things I'm trying to work on (with some frustration) is switching quickly from the "A-Shaped Barre Chord" to the "E Shaped Barre Chord" (ex. going from D to A at the 5th fret in barre chord format). I suppose it's all a function of muscle memory and practice, but any tips to make the switch easier are appreciated.


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(@handelfan)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 36
 

I find that switching from the A-shaped D to the E-shaped A at the fifth fret is achieved by minimizing the movement of your wrist and fingers.

My fingers on moveable A barre chords are kinda flat feeling, with my index finger barring, while my ring finger holds down the D, G,and B strings. Rather than lifting them up and trying to "reset" them into a new shape, which is the tendency, I just sorta lift my wrist away from my body, while gently rolling my fingers onto their tips, creating a nice curve in your fingers. This creates a sort of forward motion towards the low strings (towards your body) which naturally lands my fingertips in the right place on the A chord.

It's a slight motion, but I have found it to be very accurate, and I never need to look down to my fingers to make sure its right. Sorry if you already have it figured out due to my tardy posting on this thread.

I am where my mind put me.


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