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All acoustics harder to play than electrics?

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RollnROCK89
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I havent played very many acoustics, prolly about 3 different ones, all under 400 bucks of value. Is it just lower end acoustics that are much harder to played compared to electric, or even the 1000 dollar range? I can easily play on my Epi Lp, much easier and faster than I can play on an acoustic. Thanks.

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Elecktrablue
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The thing with electric vs. acoustic is that, in my opinion, electric is much simpler just because you don't have to work as hard. You don't have to press the string so hard that your fingertips turn white and you keep perpetual 'string ruts', barre chords are easier because you don't have to press so hard, hammer ons and pull offs are louder and clearer with very little actual effort and slides and bends take on a whole new personality with an electric. But, then again, there are a lot more variables (and expense) with an electric than with an acoustic. I play both and I practice mainly on my acoustic because when I master it on the acoustic I can fairly fly with it on the electric. But, that's just me and my humble opinion.... :-)

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NoteBoat
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They're not harder, but they're different. The strings have more tension than an electric, even if you use the same guage, because the fretboard scale length tends to be a bit longer on electrics. You need to work a bit harder with your picking hand, since the sustain of notes isn't assisted by electronics.

The fact that acoustics are 'deeper' than electrics means your picking hand will be a couple inches farther out from your body than when you play an electric. That makes one type feel 'weird' if you're used to playing the other. The angle of your picking hand wrist will change slightly, and it's more pronounced if you anchor the heel of your hand when picking, as so many guitarists tend to do.

Most electric guitarists get used to playing standing, and most acoustic guitarists get used to playing sitting. Because of that, and the typical placement of the upper strap button (if there even is one on the acoustic), neck angle will naturally be a bit different, unless you really pay attention to what you're doing. In general, most electric guitarists have a better neck angle for technique - although most will negate that advantage by wearing the guitar too low.

If you play fingerstyle, acoustics will be easier for right hand technique. There's a bit more space between the strings for you fingers. That also makes them feel weird to plectrum guitarists who've only played electric - the pick needs to move farther.

All in all, either one will seem hard if you've only played the other. The solution is to practice on both... and then when you get good at both, add a classical to the mix, which has its own challenges :)

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Slydog
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Dang, I thought I'd have something to add, but NoteBoat hit 'em all.

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gnease
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Yeah, Noteboat's covered it well -- they are just different.

One thing I'll add is that acoustics are more likely to be incorrectly setup and so can be unnecessarily difficult to play. This is often because newer players assume there are few or no adjustments to be made on an acoustic. Plus, even if it is set up correctly, settling and aging will eventually necessitate re-setup to compensate neck relief changes and some top bellying. Common setup problems on new acoustics (even some pricey ones) are high nuts and improper neck relief.

These days, a new, $250 acoustic should not be difficult to play if properly made and set up.

-Greg

-=tension & release=-


   
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michhill8
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I find after playing my friends acoustic, that going back to electric seems weird, but yet easier.?? That may help out the fingers!

Thanks Dudes!
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Nils
 Nils
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I switch back and forth daily and it always takes a little bit before I am comfortable. Each has their easy and hard parts. For instance on the acoustic the strings a farther apart which makes it easier to not accidentally mute the strings next to the one you are fretting. On the other hand the acoustics action is generally higher and harder to press. In the end it is kind of a wash and you just need to remember which you are on to concentrate on the correct features.

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stock28
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I think the accoustic requires better and cleaner technique than an electric especially with a little overdrive on. I find that if I practice a technique on my accoustic and get it right, it's much easier on my electric. For that reason I tend to use my accoustic more for "practice" and my electric more for "playing".


   
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NoteBoat
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I agree that acoustics are less forgiving than electrics if you're sloppy - distortion covers a lot of sins.

In my daily practice, I'm spending about 65% of my time on acoustic, 20% on classical, and 15% on electric. - if you don't work them all, you lose the feel pretty quickly.

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