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Am to Dm change

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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5134
 

Slejhammer, isn't that an Fmaj7/A, not an Am?

Wouldn't Fmaj7/A be x03210?
That's a more common voicing, but the other has the maj 7 as the E on the D string.

The chord you listed in your first post is a possible inversion, putting the F on the first string.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


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(@davidhodge)
Member Moderator
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 4485
 

An easier way to think of it is having a descending bass line of F, E and D being played while the F chord is being held on top. Thinking about it in this fashion also helps with playing it, especially if you're using the typical beginner's F chord fingering (xx3211). Yes, technically you can then name the chords as F, Fmaj7/E and Dm7, but most musicians wouldn't think twice about that. It's just an F chord with a descending bass line. That's how a pianist would think of it anyway and the piano is the driving instrument in the original recording.

Hope this helps.

Peace


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1092
Topic starter  

to have the chord sound right you have to form the chord the way it is written.
and it is true the change from Am to Dm is not easy. it takes practice and timing is all.
when I just played that example , F Am Dm,,, I actually lifted my fingers from the strings and formed the next chord each time.

That's kind of what I thought. The F to Am is really quick and easy. When I'm doing it as written, I am lifting my fingers from the Am then re-forming them as Dm and plunking them down. At first I thought that was wrong. I've read about lifting off completely as being a bad habit, but I guess it's not if it gets the job done. If I do it really slowly I can get it. I guess I am trying too fast.
the fingers were barely off the strings. sometimes a string will continue to ring ; it fills the gap.
just practice. and count the beat out loud. better tap your foot.
when the Am chord comes you should be able to lift off the F and form the Am in the time it takes your foot to go up and then down; counting the beat. start slow and work up to tempo. you will eventually have no problems and will find a lot of time between those three chord changes. its true.

ps: one is allowed to omit some chords. the passing chord is one example.

Haha I love the foot tap. I do it all the time. It really does help.

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1092
Topic starter  

Thanks for all the help guys. :D
An easier way to think of it is having a descending bass line of F, E and D being played while the F chord is being held on top. Thinking about it in this fashion also helps with playing it, especially if you're using the typical beginner's F chord fingering (xx3211). Yes, technically you can then name the chords as F, Fmaj7/E and Dm7, but most musicians wouldn't think twice about that. It's just an F chord with a descending bass line. That's how a pianist would think of it anyway and the piano is the driving instrument in the original recording.

Hope this helps.

Peace

Lost as I am on that one, David, I can only hope some day to be a fraction as talented as you guys are.

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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(@robjzgtr)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 8
 

It's a matter of practice practice practice like you say. I read in an old guitar player mag that a great exercise to help when having problems with chords of changes is this on:
Place the chord on the neck. Press it as hard as you can against the fretboard and hold it for 10 seconds. Then SLOWLY raise it maintaining teh form of the chord and start to hammer repeatedly the chord into the fretboard. Do that 10 times. REPEAT. I guarantee the chord will now come alot easier.

Robert
www.bluesandjazzguitar.blogspot.com


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1092
Topic starter  

Thanks Robert, I will try that. I have found, much as this is a no-brainer, that when I do it very slowly and deliberately, anticipating it, it is much better. Like too many of us beginners, I want to rush it. I've slowed down my troublesome changes (like from anything to F maj) and they work better. I should not be trying to impress anyone with my speed on the fretboard, especially if that speed is all mistakes!

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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(@wes-inman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5599
 

I would continue to practice to play the open Dm chord, but you could simply slide your Am chord up to the 6th fret and play the Dm like this:

X0776X

You can use the open A string as that is the 5th of D and it will sound good.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


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(@davidhodge)
Member Moderator
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 4485
 

Wes is right that the open high E (first) string sounds nice with this voicing. Technically you'll have a Dm(add9). You can also remember that the open D string is fair game, being the root of the D minor chord, so you can also simplify the voicing like this:

X00760

or also add the A note on the high E (first) string to get a true Dm:

X00765

Or if you want to get a little fancier, you can also just lay a finger across the first three strings at the tenth fret:

X 0 0 10 10 10

And, of course, while all this is find and dandy, you do still want to be able to play an open position D minor. It sounds like you're making progress, though. Keep with it!

Peace


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1092
Topic starter  

Thanks guys. Yes, think I'm definitely making progress. I'll try the alternates, for some mind expansion. :D As I slowed down, the Am to Dm change was more accurate. I'm convinced that I've been building bad habits in trying to change too fast in certain changes... and hand position. The Am to Dm is one, the other is the chord progression in Night Moves... G F C F G. Trying to change too fast to the F sends it all to crap. I have to make a very slow change to get it right, but it's not like I'm going on stage any time soon. And when I think about it, those are really my biggest chord change challenges. B7 and Bm aren't even bad.

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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(@cameronkl7)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 11
 

Hi everyone,

I simply go from Am to Dm by fretting the Am normally then laying my 1st finger over both the B and E string, then move my 2nd finger to the G string and my ring finger to the B string on the 3rd fret, it's much less movement with your fingers and works great, give it a try!

Cam


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(@axissupersport)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 29
 

Practice,practice,practice, practice


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(@pearlthekat)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1472
 

put your pinky down first....


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1092
Topic starter  

Oh you mean the finger no one wants to use!?

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(@davidhodge)
Member Moderator
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 4485
 

I'd be lost without mine. Seriously. It does the lion's share of hammer-ons and pull-offs and also helps me make a lot of melodic note runs on the high strings. Not to mention if makes playing songs like Norwegian Wood a snap. The more you use it now, the more it will help you later!

Peace


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1092
Topic starter  

Oh you are so right David. I read though, that people have trouble with the pinky. I have to say I can use it now better than I did in the past. It's a good finger! :D

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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