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Arrangement for two guitars?

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KirkD
(@kirkd)
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I've really enjoyed the lessons here on Guitar Noise. My only complaint is that there is so much good information that I can't possible do it all. I'll just have to keep practicing. 8^)

My nephew and I are at similar levels. He has focused much more on mimicking fast lead sections (think Coheed and Cambria) while I've been doing more broad based practice (think Hey Joe). He wants us to do a duet, but I'm having a very hard time finding something that is in the intermediate level that is arranged for two players. Is there anything here on Guitar Noise in the Intermediate or slightly higher level that would suffice? We might even be able to get his brother to work on the bass, so two guitars plus bass might work.

-Kirk


   
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jeffster1
(@jeffster1)
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For two intermediate players, sometimes the thing to do is some 12-bar blues improv. Not only will this likely sound great, but it will also improve both players ear and skill. One player plays a 12-bar blues chord progression, the other player plays an improv solo usually in the pentatonic minor and then you switch every 12-24 bars.


   
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KirkD
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We have done that to some extent, but we were hoping for something a bit more structured. Any specific song ideas?


   
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KirkD
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I just found the Wish You Were Here articles here on this site. I've done the beginner version - no problem with that one - but haven't yet attempted the Intermediate (solo) version. This might serve as a good option for our project.

Other arrangements of this sort would be particularly welcome. Wish You Were Here is a bit short in combined playing, but if there are any others that people know of that might be useful, please let me know.

-Kirk


   
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Outlaw Pete
(@outlaw-pete)
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You could try Sweet Home Alabama.

http://www.threechordguitar.com/vids.htm

That shows the rhythm and the riff but I don't know if you wanted one player to be doing strumming


   
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KirkD
(@kirkd)
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Thanks! Sweet Home Alabama isn't a bad option. It would be good if there were something with both guitarists playing simultaneously. I suppose I could come up with a decent rhythm option for that one, too.

Any other ideas are very welcome!!

-kirk


   
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cnev
 cnev
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Just find music from any band that has more than one guitar in it, GNR, Lynard Skynard, Metallica, Judas Priest etc. there are millions to choose from.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


   
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Chris C
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Hi Kirk,

This is exactly why I decided not to follow the path that goes 'Learn this song, then that one, then that one' ...

Instead I've been concentrating on trying to learn more about general music theory and arranging (it doesn't have to be that tough or geeky... :wink: ) so that I can take pretty much ANY piece of music and simplify or complicate it to taste.

I'm just one beginner, so I obviously can't simultaneously play all the parts that a 5 piece pro band did. So I'll be using somebody's simplified arrangement. It might have a complete original melody or solo line, or maybe a partial or amended version. It might be just a simple version of the chord progression, or whatever. But if the essential bits are there it will still be recognisable as a version, and sound OK.

The difference for me is that instead of having to hunt for something pre-done to suit whatever levels that I'm at (and it might be me and a friend or me and a recording of me playing another part...) then I can fairly quickly run through and amend the bits that would be out of our/my league.

That's the theory anway... :mrgreen:

But it seems to be working. When I play with my weekly group we regularly change what's on the sheet music. Even with my own efforts I have had some success. Last week I was trying to work out how to finger all those fancy holes and levers on a clarinet. In the process of hooting, honking and squawking I accidentally played three notes in row that sounded 'classical'. After a bit of experimenting I'd worked out the main theme, over maybe eight or ten bars, of a piece of Beethoven. Now it's supposed to be played with a professional orchestra of maybe 120 people(??) not one duffer on a clarinet. But once I had the notes in the right order, and the timing right, it was utterly recognisable. More importantly it was satisfying and fun to play.

Now I just need to find 119 mates... :wink:

Maybe you could add a bit of study of arranging to your list of goals? I'm sure it would pay off...

Cheers,

Chris


   
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