Skip to content
Notifications
Clear all

B minor cord


(@lukesoreson)
New Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1
Topic starter  

I have a question about the B minor cord, I see there are several (3) versions that i can find on different ways the B minor cord is played.

one way is to play the 1st string 2nd fret then the 2nd string 3rd fret then the 3rd and 4th string on the 4th fret,

another is to cover the 5th string also with the index finger,

and then another is the one you list on guitar noise,

My question (s) is how is it to be played and why so many varieties of that cord?


Quote
(@alangreen)
Member Moderator
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5366
 

Hi, and welcome to Guitarnoise.

All those ways are correct, and the difference between them is in the voicing.

Briefly, when you play a Bm chord you are playing the notes B, D and F#. There are four of each of those notes on the neck of most guitars so there is plenty of scope for using whichever shape sounds good to you and which you can stretch to with your fingers easily.

There are also "easy" versions of the chord which are suitable for beginners. The full Bm chord at the 2nd or the 7th fret involves a full barre - using your index finger across all six strings - and it's just not possible to throw things like that at beginners and expect them to play them without doing themselves some damage.

We have a lot of lessons on this site which will teach you how chords are constructed and why they sound the way they do. They're all worth checking out as part of your knowledge-building exercises.

Best,

A :-)

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk


ReplyQuote
(@yashicamat)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 272
 

If you try the Bmin chord shape with the 1st finger on the 2nd fret, 2nd finger on 3rd fret, 3rd and 4th fingers on the 4th fret, you can see you've effectively formed part of a full barre Bmin. All the barre does is give you the 5th string as well for a fuller sound.
It's worth practicing barre chords, hard as they may be, but they get easier with time. :)

Rob

If something's not worth doing it's worth forgetting about.
Epiphone Les Paul Std - Yamaha Pacifica 112XJ - Takamine EG340SC - Taylor Baby - Grainger Hammerhead 50 - Grainger Valve Five
http://www.youtube.com/yashicamatonline


ReplyQuote
(@hbriem)
Honorable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 646
 

If you try the Bmin chord shape with the 1st finger on the 2nd fret, 2nd finger on 3rd fret, 3rd and 4th fingers on the 4th fret, you can see you've effectively formed part of a full barre Bmin. All the barre does is give you the 5th string as well for a fuller sound.

Yes, and even the 3-string version:

e|--2----
B|--3----
G|--4----
D|--x----
A|--x----
E|--x----

gives you a full B minor chord with very easy fingering. (F# on the 1st string, D on the 2nd, B on the 3rd)

If you hit the open D string (4th) by accident you're still OK because the D note is part of the chord.

I use this a lot in songs using the open D because you can use the pinkie to finger the 3rd string 4th fret while still holding the D shape with the other 3 fingers.

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


ReplyQuote
(@wrkngclsshero)
Trusted Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 57
 

for my two cents play the 5 string version (at least try to).
e|--2----
B|--3----
G|--4----
D|--4----
A|--2----
E|--x----

You'll thank yourself later when you try to learn barre chords. If you can't though, there's no crime in baby steps.

"A working class hero is something to be..." -J. Lennon


ReplyQuote
(@clideguitar)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 376
 

for my two cents play the 5 string version (at least try to).
You'll thank yourself later when you try to learn barre chords. If you can't though, there's no crime in baby steps.

I agree, I started out with the three string version but now it doesn't even sound right....

BJ


ReplyQuote
(@hbriem)
Honorable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 646
 

You'll thank yourself later when you try to learn barre chords. If you can't though, there's no crime in baby steps.

I myself have used barre chords for decades. I was recommending the 3 string version for a beginner who cannot yet and wants to play a particular song or, as I said, as a variation on the open D chord.

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


ReplyQuote