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Backup Guitarist

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warkthogus
(@warkthogus)
Eminent Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 20
Topic starter  

Hey, my brother and I have a small band that likes to jam together. The problem is that our "lead" guitarist sucks. I am absolutely in love with playing backup chords, but I need to work on being the lead. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Note: We play pretty hard rock. What are some note combinations and SHORT rifts that sound well in 4/4 time on the lead?

Thanks everyone!

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"You were born an original, don't die a copy"
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yoyo286
(@yoyo286)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1681
 

work on scales.

Stairway to Freebird!


   
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BMXdude
(@bmxdude)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 119
 

Scales arn't music just guidlines. Use them but Don't let them own your music.

"The answer is practice.
Now, what's the question?"
Words by David Mead.


   
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greybeard
(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

Scales are the very fabric of music, but simply knowing them will not make you a musician.
You have to be able to understand when to use which keys (in my world that's a scale applied to a specific root note). You have to know where those keys are on the fretboard.
Then you have to learn to make the riffs interesting and relevant to the song, as a whole.

Without the foundation of scales (and music theory, in general) it's going to be luck and guesswork.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
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alexduller
(@alexduller)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 58
 

In what way does the lead guitar suck?? If its the actual music that is played that is the problem, then record a few backing chords and get the lead guitar playing a few scales over the top(i suggest learning minor pentatonics first)....once u are comfortable with this and know which notes sound gd over certain bits, then start experimenting with this and write some ideas down. If the lead guitar sucks technically, then come up with sumthing simple and agen record the backing chords and then the lead guitar can practice on hsi own if this fails get a self-tutor book on lead guitar....hope this helps in sum way...

Alex

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DayZd
(@dayzd)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 138
 

Dude, why don't you rather give your lead some pointers and help him out instead of saying he sucks. Man...everybody has to start somewhere. I'm sure you "sucked" aswell in the beginning. I know I "sucked" when I first started. Give him a chance.

Anything that is too stupid to be spoken is sung

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<--=-.._DayZd_..-=-->


   
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yoyo286
(@yoyo286)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1681
 

^extactly, make him work on scales to get him better, then he can make up his own stuff.

Stairway to Freebird!


   
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Ignar Hillström
(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5349
 

DayZd: that was so good I'm just going to quote you:
Dude, why don't you rather give your lead some pointers and help him out instead of saying he sucks. Man...everybody has to start somewhere. I'm sure you "sucked" aswell in the beginning. I know I "sucked" when I first started. Give him a chance.


   
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Nils
 Nils
(@nils)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2849
 

DayZd: that was so good I'm just going to quote you:
Dude, why don't you rather give your lead some pointers and help him out instead of saying he sucks. Man...everybody has to start somewhere. I'm sure you "sucked" aswell in the beginning. I know I "sucked" when I first started. Give him a chance.

Double quote for great advice

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Taso
 Taso
(@taso)
Famed Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 2811
 

Would a triple qoute take it to far?

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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forrok_star
(@forrok_star)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2337
 

I read about scales, modes, double stops, bends, inverted chords and voicing. The theory was hard and heavy but the knowledge is useful and pays off. I discovered where chords came from and what scales sounded best where and could relate to them no matter what key the song was in. I figured out which chords and scales belonged together and when they didn't, I would memorize every key and the structures of everything associated and related to them.

Practicing finger exercises and scales made my fingers fast and accurate. The Modes, vibratos, bends, inverted chords and countless hours practicing were the hub of my universe for building the stepping stones between the music and my improvisational ideas. That inner Quest wasn't just for tone but also knowledge, knowledge to know what is needed to enhance a piece music and put together that song I heard in my head.

As my knowledge grew and filtered down from my brain through my soul to my fingers I began to feel comfortable exploring the fretboard. Thinking analytically and not being content with playing around the same well-trotted paths that so many others have utilized as their playground for so many years. I wanted to play anything and everything along with being able to improvise to any style at will.

The most enlightening aspect about this whole adventure is that I worked it all out and used the knowledge well. Playing in a band and now mainly a freelance guitarist, is and has been the most exciting and rewarding time. With lots of dedication, hard work, and an open positive mind the good times out numbered the bad times, I can look back over the many years, see whats been achieved and what still needs to be. Knowing it's time to pass the knowledge on.

This may not be what you hoped for but the answers are there.

Joe


   
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DayZd
(@dayzd)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 138
 

Would a triple qoute take it to far?

Well...you know... 8) :wink:

Anything that is too stupid to be spoken is sung

-----------------------

<--=-.._DayZd_..-=-->


   
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Tommy Guns
(@tommy-guns)
Honorable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 314
 

forrok_star

Just for a benchmark, how long did this process take for you?

"I discovered where chords came from and what scales sounded best where and could relate to them no matter what key the song was in. I figured out which chords and scales belonged together and when they didn't, I would memorize every key and the structures of everything associated and related to them."

Ambition is the path to success...persistence is the vehicle you arrive in!!!


   
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BMXdude
(@bmxdude)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 119
 

forrok_star wroteI read about scales, modes, double stops, bends, inverted chords and voicing. The theory was hard and heavy but the knowledge is useful and pays off. I discovered where chords came from and what scales sounded best where and could relate to them no matter what key the song was in. I figured out which chords and scales belonged together and when they didn't, I would memorize every key and the structures of everything associated and related to them.

Practicing finger exercises and scales made my fingers fast and accurate. The Modes, vibratos, bends, inverted chords and countless hours practicing were the hub of my universe for building the stepping stones between the music and my improvisational ideas. That inner Quest wasn't just for tone but also knowledge, knowledge to know what is needed to enhance a piece music and put together that song I heard in my head.

As my knowledge grew and filtered down from my brain through my soul to my fingers I began to feel comfortable exploring the fretboard. Thinking analytically and not being content with playing around the same well-trotted paths that so many others have utilized as their playground for so many years. I wanted to play anything and everything along with being able to improvise to any style at will.

The most enlightening aspect about this whole adventure is that I worked it all out and used the knowledge well. Playing in a band and now mainly a freelance guitarist, is and has been the most exciting and rewarding time. With lots of dedication, hard work, and an open positive mind the good times out numbered the bad times, I can look back over the many years, see whats been achieved and what still needs to be. Knowing it's time to pass the knowledge on.

This may not be what you hoped for but the answers are there.

Joe

Is that to big of quote :?: Anyways where would you reccomend a beginning guitarist like me shoud start learning about music theory. I pretty much have no education on that factor.

"The answer is practice.
Now, what's the question?"
Words by David Mead.


   
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Ignar Hillström
(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5349
 

Just follow David's lessons. That little bugger sneaks far more theory in then you really notice. And by the time you realise he is teaching theory it's probably oo late, and you've learned it already. :D


   
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