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Barre chords

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(@hello)
Eminent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

Hi,

I've been trying barre chords for a while, but i'm wondering which finger i should put down first. I know you should put down all at once but that just impossible for now.

I've been practicing by putting my pinky, ring- and middlefinger on the right string and then laying my index finger over all the strings.
However a friend told me that it is better to first put down your indexfinger on all the strings and then the other fingers...who can help me?


   
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(@pappajohn)
Honorable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 533
 

Personally, I found your way easier.

-- John

"Hip woman walking on a moving floor, tripping on the escalator.
There's a man in the line and she's blowin' his mind, thinking that he's already made her."

'Coming into Los Angeles' - Arlo Guthrie


   
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(@shibby)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 145
 

I learned your way.


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

It's a toss-up.

The index finger locates the position for the chord, so getting it in the right place is critical - after all, it's fretting more notes than the other fingers. Therefore most guitarists will place the index first, or at least be thinking primarily of index position while putting all their fingers down at once.

When you're learning, fact is... not everyone is built the same. Some folks have longer/shorter fingers than others, so it's hard to imitate another guitarist and get good tone. By placing the non-index fingers first, you get a good arch to them, and the position of the index falls right into line - overhanging the 6th string if you have larger hands. It's easier to learn your barre chords this way.

Once you've got consistently good tone, work on placing all your fingers at once.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
Famed Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 2811
 

Yeah,

I'd say it really doesn't make a difference. When all's said and done, you'll be putting the index and the other fingers on at the same time. I did it the way you do it though.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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(@hello)
Eminent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

Thanks for the replies!

The problem is that i've got the feeling that i'm a bit stuck with the way i'm learning now. Sometimes the chord transitions are quite smooth and the chord sound really well, but most of the time changing to a barre chord sounds bad (not fast enough, fretting the wrong strings etc)

That's why i thought about going the other way around, putting the index finger down first. I find this even harder though so i think i'll stick with my own method and just practice, practice and pactice some more....


   
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(@david-m1)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 122
 

Anyone have any Ideas on transitioning to Barre chords, I can play most open chords changing with no problems, its like automatic, most of the time. But Barre chords although I can play them well all notes ringing no dead thud of the strings, but transitioning to them thats my problem, when I try to play them at speed thats when I get the dead notes and thuds.

Any Ideas,
Practice routines
Postioning of Body, arm, hand....

Any thought are appreciated.. oh yeah I play acoustic guitar. been playing two years.


   
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(@goodvichunting)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 326
 

David

I am just beginning to get comfortable with changing from open to barre chords. What I have been trying to do is SLOWLY form the barre chord with my fingers before planting it on the guitar and then plant them all at once.

Try it everyday for 10 mins and see in 2 weeks. You will be pleasantly surprised.

Vic

Latest addition: Cover of "Don't Panic" by Coldplay
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=502670


   
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(@axeslasher)
Trusted Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 63
 

Since most barre chords use the same formations of standard open chords (just moved up a few frets using the index finger as a capo), I practiced by first forming the open chord using non-index fingers, then sliding that to where I wanted it and laying down the index.

"Sometimes you want to give up the guitar, you'll hate the guitar. But if you stick with it, you're gonna be rewarded." - Jimi Hendrix


   
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(@david-m1)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 122
 

Thanks for the replys and suggestions, I think I'll do like Pleph, and Vic suggested, just more practice. I need to dedicate some time to this, I feel if I can get my barre chords up to speed it's going to really make a difference in my playing.


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

cut out the barre chords jazz .do it whatever way u like finger barre or thumbs down its gonna take u months and atleast 2 or more.It takes time and it give pain.Sure , but u will like it 8)


   
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(@hello)
Eminent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

Hey all,

With a lot of practice i think i'm getting there...my barre chords are a lot better and quicker, but now i've ecountered another problem...my thumb hurts!

I can still more or less play with it, but it's not really comfortable and i'm afraid that it won't do any any good in the long run...

I know it's from the barre chords, i never had this when i played open chords.

Is this normal for beginners and will it go away? or am i doing something wrong?


   
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(@axeslasher)
Trusted Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 63
 

There are two things to check. First, when playing barre chords, your thumb will be a little higher (toward the low E string) on the back of the neck. Second, make sure you're not squeezing "too" hard just to get a good sound. The goal, right now, is to get your fingers into the right positions on demand, not to make a perfect sound. That comes with time.

What part of your thumb is hurting? If it's the knuckle, then something may be wrong. If it's the muscles and tendons in the heel of your hand and between your thumb and index finger, then I'd say you're well on your way to successful barring! You've probably not used the muscles before. Even some pain in the pad of your thumb may be expected. As these muscles develop, the pain will subside.

If it hurts to the point that it is effecting your other playing, don't practice them for too long. Intersperse them through your practice in small increments so that your thumb has a chance to rest.

"Sometimes you want to give up the guitar, you'll hate the guitar. But if you stick with it, you're gonna be rewarded." - Jimi Hendrix


   
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