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(@deanobeano)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 127
Topic starter  

Brought total guitar the other day and i want to learn razorlights somewhere else which is inside, but it needs a capo at the 2nd fret which i dont have. I was wondering if an tight elastic band or sting would do or am i being stupid ? thanx


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(@matthew)
Trusted Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 55
 

Hrm,

I don't think either would work. If you got them REALLY tight, you might be able to hold the strings against the fret, but I think the strings would still slide back and fourth when you strum/pick.

You could just tune your guitar up 1 whole step. That would be equivalent to a capo on the 2nd fret. Careful you don't break a string.

"Now people put you down for the way that you lived
But those people never knew you the way that I did
Don't be ashamed of who you were of how you died
I know you just wanted to find the brighter side..." - OPM

- Matthew


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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5134
 

You should buy a capo. They're a handy and necessary tool for guitar.

If you want to play that song along with the CD, the capo will help a lot. Otherwise you'll need to know which chords sound (as opposed to which chords are played), and play the chords that sound. For example, if you capo at the second fret and play a D, an E sounds. You could play an E.

If you don't want to play with the CD, just play the chords on the music without the capo. You'll still be playing the song, but you'll be playing it in a different key.

Check out The Underappreciated Art of Using a Capo for a good introduction to the capo.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


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(@chris-c)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3460
 

Hi,

You could make a home made capo, but they're not that expensive to buy.

The trick is to find something that's tough enough to hold the strings down but that's not going to damage the guitar. Your guitar fretboard is probably curved, so you need to find something that you can bend or flex to fit the curve.

For instance, just for fun, after reading your post I took a thick 3" long softwood match (the big ones for lighting stoves) and doubled up an elastic band and made a capo. The elastic band went behind the neck (not over it) and hooked onto either end of the match. It worked but it wasn't pretty and it took a bit of fiddling before it worked without buzzing. Amazingly the match didn't break and it bent enough to work. I wouldn't want to rely on it though.

Better to buy one, they're quite handy. :)


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(@alangreen)
Member Moderator
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5366
 

... just for fun, after reading your post I took a thick 3" long softwood match (the big ones for lighting stoves) and doubled up an elastic band and made a capo.

You need to get out more, Chris. Excellent solution, though.

A :-)

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk


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(@primeta)
Prominent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 836
 

If you can afford it, a Dunlop trigger capo will make your life easier. I see one online price at 15 pounds. There are cheaper ones around 6 pound, but the Dunlop trigger is easy take on and off.

"Things may get a whole lot worse/ Before suddenly falling apart"
Steely Dan
"Look at me coyote, don't let a little road dust put you off" Knopfler


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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

I agree, you can make do with something homemade but capos are not expensive and you will find you use it often so ir is well worth buying.
I have a Dunlop trigger capo $20 USD and a cheaper thumbscrew type about $5 USD. I actually use the thumbscrew one more often (because it is with the guitar I play most often)
The difference between the Trigger capo and thumbscrew, Trigger takes about 1 to 2 seconds to put on and take off the thumbscrew takes about 10 to 15 seconds. Both work the same.


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(@alangreen)
Member Moderator
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5366
 

No competition - get a Shubb.

A :-)

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk


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(@primeta)
Prominent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 836
 

Actually, I'm going to buy a Shubb next myself, but I think it's a good idea to have at least one quick change about. :)

"Things may get a whole lot worse/ Before suddenly falling apart"
Steely Dan
"Look at me coyote, don't let a little road dust put you off" Knopfler


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(@tuckatangent)
Eminent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 22
 

Yeah, I had to buy a capo, so I bought the cheapest one, an elastic with like a glass or plastic inside. It works okay, but it always causes buzzing on my low E. I have to fiddle with it a bit to get the low E to sound. When I can afford it, I'll probably a buy a shubb - I've also heard good things about Kayser. The capo I have now costs me 7 bucks, which is probably why it doesn't hold down ALL the strings. Le sigh.


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(@chris-c)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3460
 

You need to get out more, Chris.

A :-)

Yes, ain't that the truth!!

NEXT year - honestly! :D

Actually I enjoy that sort of challenge. I could have gone out to my workshop, shaped a piece of wood or metal, fitted some suitable padding and made a decent working capo, but I just fancied seeing if I could make one with something simple that was lying around the house.

Next week, the Cornflakes packet guitar (with built in shaker effect)......


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(@snarfy)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 119
 

Chris, do you prefer a set neck, or a bolt-on neck on your Corn Flakes guitar?

I find that the set neck provides much better sustain. I plan on upgrading my corn flakes model soon. I'm going to add rasins. I need something to soften that crunch.


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(@rik-anderson)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 140
 

Chris and Snarfy, sorry guys but shouldn't that come under guitar maintenance and repair The pair of you have lost it big time methinks lmao :D :D :D

The only thing that keeps me from realising my full potential is the depressing awareness that it wouldn't take much time or effort...


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(@snarfy)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 119
 

My apologies....this was about capos, wasn't it?

Get one. They're really good string holder-downers. And, depsite Chris' excellent idea for a version made of a matchstick (I imagine he's not responding here because he dashed off to the patent office with that idea), I recommend getting a store-bought version.
:)


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(@bennett)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 297
 

Just to add to the others, I would recommend purchasing a capo. I bought a Kayser trigger-style one. Cost about $A30.

Had a bit of a muck around with it last night, just playing songs I'd learnt without a capo ... actually sounds really cool and gives a bit of variety to songs you already know. :D

From little things big things grow - Paul Kelly


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