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Capo Help


(@ilovetheguitar)
Active Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 5
Topic starter  

Has anyone tried or is using any of the following Capos?

Kyser
Shubb
G7th

What are your opinions on them? Which would you pick if you had to pick one of the three? Please review them too :)


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(@chris-c)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3460
 

Hi,

I have several different styles and makes of capo and they all work fine. It's not really that tough a job to hold the strings down - you can even make one that works from a rubber band and a small piece of softwood. I'm sure that all the old blues guys improvised their own out of whatever was at hand. So I'd just pick whichever one you like the look and feel of when you put it on, and seems like reasonable value for the money. :)

Others may have more detailed opinions, or have some personal reason for favouring one brand over another. But I've never had any problem with any of mine. The cheap ones that I have do the job just as well as the flasher looking ones, and none of them came supplied with talent - so I just grab whichever one is closest at the time. 8) Some folks get right into accessories for their hobbies, and get a kick out of fancy shapes and nifty knobs (and why not...). But if you just want something to change key while you play then you don't need to spend much or buy something that looks like it came off a Starship. And in my experience, the more elaborate they are the more likely they are to get in the way when you play or when you need to lean the guitar against something. Good hunting.

Cheers,

Chris


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 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3998
 

G7th's are very famous and they have received several awards. Around $40 at Musician Friends.
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/G7th-Performance-Guitar-Capo-Classical?sku=361632

I have a Jim Dunlop capo. 5 €. It works fine. ;)
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Dunlop-Pro-Curved-Guitar-Capo?sku=365019

I completely agree with Chris.


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(@twistedlefty)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4166
 

i use my kyser 12 string model for all my guitars

#4491....


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(@jewtemplar)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 186
 

I have the Shubb and I'm very happy with it. I think pretty much anything is fine, although the very cheapest elastic ones seem like a pain.

~Sam


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 Bish
(@bish)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3765
 

Kyser here, too, even though I'm trying to learn to transpose instead of capo.

Bish

"I play live as playing dead is harder than it sounds!"


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(@slejhamer)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 3297
 

i use my kyser 12 string model for all my guitars

Me too!

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


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(@ilovetheguitar)
Active Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 5
Topic starter  

Has anyone here tried the G7th capo ?


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(@medarrah)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 103
 

I use my kyser 12 string model for all my guitars
Me Too!

Same here! I find it works great. Sorry, no experience with the G7th.


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(@yournightmare)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 108
 

Has anyone here tried the G7th capo ?Me. It's the only one I use. I love it. I gave away my other capos.


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(@daniel-lioneye)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 235
 

Kyser all the way 8)

Guitars: Electric: Jackson DX10D, J. Reynolds Fat Strat copy
Acoustic: New York and a Jasmine.
Amps: Austin 15 watt, Fender Deluxe 112, Fender Champion 600 5w, 0ld 1970's Sears 500g.
Effects: Digitech Whammy, Big Muff Pi USA, MXR, Washburn Distortion.


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 mmdm
(@mmdm)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 130
 

Kyser is quick to put on and off. I use it on my electrics, but it doesn't fit my Taylor acoustic very well.

Shubb has a nice small profile, doesn't get in the way at all. I use it on the Taylor and it fits perfectly. Might be a nuisance if you used it on different guitars, because you might have to adjust it for each one, if the guitar necks were much different.

Haven't tried the G7.


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(@squidward)
Active Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 10
 

I use the jim Dunlop curved capo. It's cheap, works just fine on my acoustic and electric guitars. Also I don't need to change capo position or take it on and off in a hurry. I suppose if you were playing a gig taking it off and putting it on would probably be a bit slow but I play for my own pleasure and while a big piece of aluminium with a spring attached may look a bit more professional for a low tech person like me the Dunlop is fine, and is also $12 Aus compared to $45 Aus.
It may be a good idea to take your guitar(s) down to your local music shop and try a few different capos.

"It's pretty clear now that what looked like it might have been some kind of counterculture is, in reality, just the plain old chaos of undifferentiated weirdness."
- Jerry Garcia

Have A nice Life
Squidward


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 mmdm
(@mmdm)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 130
 

.....
It may be a good idea to take your guitar(s) down to your local music shop and try a few different capos.

That's a really good idea. Or try them on the same kind of guitar at the shop. I actually bought 2 that didn't work on my Taylor. The third time, I tried the Shubb on at the store BEFORE I bought it. :D


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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

I use a Kyser.

When I give a lesson dealing with capos, I show three different kinds - most capos can be seen as one of these basic designs.

1. elasic capos

2. cam operated capos

3. spring operated capos

Elastic ones work fine, and they're dirt cheap - that MF one us under $2. The disadvantage is that they're not very easy to move around.

Spring operated ones work fine, but they're expensive - usually around $20-30. They're lightning fast to move, though, and most pros will use some form of spring capo.

The cam operated ones are in the middle - easier to move than an elastic one, but harder than a spring one. But this is the only kind I do not recommend.

As you move the cam to tighten the capo, pressure against the strings increases until the cam lever is straight up - then it decreases as it settles into place. This design puts more pressure on the strings than you need, and it does it twice per cycle: once going on, and once coming off.

Since the capo is placed close to a fret wire, the extra pressure can quickly wear your frets. If you use a capo frequently, is it really worth saving $10 on your capo, but spending $50 a year or so on refretting?

(I'm averaging the cost of a $100 partial refret every couple of years against the typical price difference between cam and spring capos. But they're not even always cheaper - I've seen some expensive capos that operate on a cam principle, which is the worst of both worlds!)

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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