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Changing Chords.

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Chlozo
(@chlozo)
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Topic starter  

When you start to change chords, theres like a 10 second delay for me when I like look at where I'm putting my fingers. Ive only just decided to swap between to chords at the moment, then I'll go onto 3. Whats the best way to get quicker? Just keep repeating it? Is it best to look at where your putting them or not?

Also with the D7 chord I can't seem to get the 2nd string right. I know the 3rd finger is accidently going against it but I can never seem to change the finger in a position where it doesnt touch. Helpp!
Cheers.


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Musenfreund
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Repetition is the mother of learning.

Do you type? If you do, I'll bet you used to hesitate to find different letters. Now I'll bet it's automatic. Muscle memory means you don't need to process consciously what you're doing. The same thing will happen with chord changes. Someday you'll find yourself changing without thinking about it.

Check out David's Absolute Beginner Part 1: chords and Chords 101 from Acoustic Guitar Magazine. I think you'll find them helpful.

Regarding the D7, make sure you're using the tips of your fingers and that your fingers are arched.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
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Chlozo
(@chlozo)
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Topic starter  

True about the typing thing, when I first started on the computer I used to hesitate and now I can touch type. hehe.


Billie-Joe Armstrong is HOT! He's my future husband. Ha ;)


   
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cnev
 cnev
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Something that might help is that once you have the chord shape and there are no dead strings just lift your fingers slightly off of the fretboard but not completely off the strings. Then press down. Keep repaeating this and maybe move farther and farther away until it becomes comfortable.

As Muse said it's all about repetition, you'l get it after a few hundred times.

we all went through the same thing and asked the same questions when we started. Now matter how frustrated you feel you will get it eventually, just keep it up.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


   
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dogbite
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you sound about right. actually, you're doing better than most.

it takes time to develop that muscle memory. the time between chords will shorten.
you'll be a speed demon.

time, patience, and practice.

Ive been playing a long time now. started in 65. switching chords is second nature.
some are so natural it feels like ive flooped onto my favorite sofa.

no bragging, just trying to give you encouragement. you'll get there.
one day you'll being playing something you never thought you could.

and then you will embark on that long and lonely platteau...
until you move to the next one.

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greybeard
(@greybeard)
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chlozo,

try to visualise the next chord that you're going to play.

Let's take something easy, like a change from E to Am - same shape, just moved over one string.

Make the E chord and strum - slowly, one beat per second and just down strokes.

When you feel comfortable with that, keep strumming and, at the same time, picture the Am chord in your mind - think of where your fingers are going to go - ignore where they ARE, just concentrate on where they are to go.

When you are clear, in your mind, that you have the Am fixed, in your mind's eye, just pick up your fingers and move them - don't make a conscious effort to do it. Chances are that you've landed on a pretty much perfect Am chord.

Now do the same, but in the opposite direction - Am to E.

It won't take long before you're doing the change, without consciously thinking about it

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
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Anonymous
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I have found the most amazing thing that happened in my playing.
I, just like all of us, started right were you are right now.
I couldn't play even a simple song for 3 or 4 weeks because of the long time it took me to change chords.
Mostly just practice changing chords and trying to think ahead (ok i have 3 more strums and then my fingers need to go this way)took care of that
The amazing thing for me now?
I no longer have to think of where my fingers have to go anymore on most open chords. I just have to think of what chord is next and it is automatic.
You will have this same feeling in less time than you might expect as long as you stick with it and keep practicing :D


   
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Patrick
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When you start to change chords, theres like a 10 second delay for me when I like look at where I'm putting my fingers.
Take how ever long you need...Open chords are difficult for quite a while, until you build up the muscle memory.Whats the best way to get quicker? Just keep repeating it? Is it best to look at where your putting them or not?Yes...just keep repeating it, preferably to a metronome, then speed up gradually only as you're able to. I had success by isolating specific chord changes and working on them one at a time. At first you'll need to look at your hands constantly (sometimes both). But, with enough practice (hundreds or thousands of repetitions), you'll eventually hit that magical moment when you notice that you can switch without looking for a few moments.


   
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Anonymous
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Does repitition help in playing 'non-chorded' songs as well?


   
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Anonymous
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YES


   
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Ignar Hillström
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Repetition works with everything involving muscle-action as well as with repeating thoughts.


   
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Narn
 Narn
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1) Repitition is key. Repitition is key. Repitition is key. Repitition is key....

2) Start slowly, practice doing it right, not necessarily doing it fast.

3) Once you master this show me how.

Take Care

"You want WHAT on the *&%#ing ceiling?" - Michelangelo, 1566


   
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Anonymous
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I just have a question about notation of tabs and chords. When they give you the lyrics and the chord names above it like this:

Em
I was going nowhere

G
going nowhere fast

Does it mean strum the chord once? Or does it mean keep strumming that chord until another chord name is shown?


   
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Chlozo
(@chlozo)
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Topic starter  

It means keep strumming that chord until you have to change to the next one. :)


Billie-Joe Armstrong is HOT! He's my future husband. Ha ;)


   
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