Close
Skip to content

Forum

Notifications
Clear all

Chord progression tips

Page 2 / 3

 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 3998
 

Ah, Ok!

Sorry.

Now you must memorize the chords names. There are some tables that could help you (for example, ).

And just a comment. Usually the tablatures are written from "e" (up) to "E" (down). So, the A chord is:

e --0--
B --2--
G --2--
D --2--
A --0--
E --x--


ReplyQuote
(@boxboy)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1226
 

Great little chart, Nuno.
Thanks!
:)

Don


ReplyQuote
(@raevin)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Ah, Ok!

Sorry.

Now you must memorize the chords names. There are some tables that could help you (for example, ).

And just a comment. Usually the tablatures are written from "e" (up) to "E" (down). So, the A chord is:

e --0--
B --2--
G --2--
D --2--
A --0--
E --x--

Bah, no worries, lol. We're players...we always make tiny mistakes :D

Thanks for that :D It's kind of hard for me to read, but...meh, I'll print it off at work and see if it's easier that way. :)

Stupid question...but, when you say "e" (up)...you mean the 6th (thick) string, correct?


ReplyQuote
(@hyperborea)
Prominent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 833
 

Stupid question...but, when you say "e" (up)...you mean the 6th (thick) string, correct?

'e' (up) refers to the high pitched E string which is the lowest spatially (closest to the ground) when holding the guitar in playing position. Just as "up" the neck refers to moving towards the body of the guitar and away from the head because in that direction the pitch goes up.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


ReplyQuote
(@raevin)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Stupid question...but, when you say "e" (up)...you mean the 6th (thick) string, correct?

'e' (up) refers to the high pitched E string which is the lowest spatially (closest to the ground) when holding the guitar in playing position. Just as "up" the neck refers to moving towards the body of the guitar and away from the head because in that direction the pitch goes up.
So, even on sheet music that has tabs with it, the top string is actually string 1, and not string 6 like I've been thinking? (if so, then I gotta make some changes to my playing T_T).

So, actually, tab is like this:
String 1
String 2
String 3
String 4
String 5
String 6??

Also, I thought the guitar went low-E/B/D/G/A/high-E?


ReplyQuote
(@hyperborea)
Prominent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 833
 

So, even on sheet music that has tabs with it, the top string is actually string 1, and not string 6 like I've been thinking? (if so, then I gotta make some changes to my playing T_T).

That's it. In tab the string representation on the top of the tab is the high E string - the one closest to the ground. In chord notation the string on the right is the high E string - the one closest to the ground. Imagine that you are looking at the fretboard of the guitar when you look at tab with the head of the guitar to the left and the body to the right.
Also, I thought the guitar went low-E/B/D/G/A/high-E?

In standard tuning the guitar runs from the low string (lowest pitched - the thickest and furthest from the ground) to the high string (highest pitched - the thinnest and closest to the ground) - E A D G B E.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


ReplyQuote
(@raevin)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

So, even on sheet music that has tabs with it, the top string is actually string 1, and not string 6 like I've been thinking? (if so, then I gotta make some changes to my playing T_T).

That's it. In tab the string representation on the top of the tab is the high E string - the one closest to the ground. In chord notation the string on the right is the high E string - the one closest to the ground. Imagine that you are looking at the fretboard of the guitar when you look at tab with the head of the guitar to the left and the body to the right.
Also, I thought the guitar went low-E/B/D/G/A/high-E?

In standard tuning the guitar runs from the low string (lowest pitched - the thickest and furthest from the ground) to the high string (highest pitched - the thinnest and closest to the ground) - E A D G B E.
Hmmm...well then...:D Thank you much for the explanations. This will probably explain why the songs I've been playing/attempting have not sounded quite right.

One last question, though...you still play cords in the E B G D A E, right?


ReplyQuote
(@hyperborea)
Prominent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 833
 

One last question, though...you still play cords in the E B G D A E, right?

When you write out chords in a line (embedding them in text or something) then you write them out in the order of low pitched string to high pitched string - so they are written out for the strings in this order (standard tuning) E A D G B E. So, for example, a regular A chord is x02220 or an E chord is 022100 or a D chord is xx0232. Those numbers are the frets that you play with a 0 meaning play it open and an x meaning mute it or don't strike it. No indication of fingering is given in these.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


ReplyQuote
 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 3998
 

when you say "e" (up)...you mean the 6th (thick) string, correct?
Really I mean "top" no "up", the high "e" is the first line in the diagram (tablature) and the low "E" is the sixth. But Hyperborea explained it perfectly.

Roughly, a chord is a combination of notes, for example, C major is C + E + G. Always you play that notes you will be playing that chord. If you play C major as "x32010" (remember that we wrote "EADGBe" or "654321" strings) you are playing "xCEGCE", the notes of that chord. Note that you even can play the open 6th because you are playing an E that is part of the chord. You could use that "fingering" or whatever "fingering" that selects the same notes. There are also chord inversions but let us leave these things for the next week.

Now, trying to answer your question, you must put each finger in the corresponding fret and string. If you put your fingers in a "mirror" position, first, it is much more difficult (I guess some positions will be impossible) and, second, you will playing another "chord".

Thus, read the chart, the numbers under every chord diagram indicate the fingers used: 1-index, 2-middle, 3-ring, 4-pinky (sometimes the thumb is also used and it is noted as T). If that chart is hard for you, try one of these charts.

(Boxboy: You are welcome! ;))


ReplyQuote
(@raevin)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

One last question, though...you still play cords in the E B G D A E, right?

When you write out chords in a line (embedding them in text or something) then you write them out in the order of low pitched string to high pitched string - so they are written out for the strings in this order (standard tuning) E A D G B E. So, for example, a regular A chord is x02220 or an E chord is 022100 or a D chord is xx0232. Those numbers are the frets that you play with a 0 meaning play it open and an x meaning mute it or don't strike it. No indication of fingering is given in these.
Ah, okay. Sorry to keep bothering 'bout this stuff and veer this off topic ^.^; But...take this image for example:

The far left string would be the thickest one, correct? Which, would be a low-E. Then the string that you start the strumming on would be an A, correct? I know this is more *BASIC* beginner stuff, but I feel like I've been playing wrong for the last week now, heh.
Roughly, a chord is a combination of notes, for example, C major is C + E + G. Always you play that notes you will be playing that chord. If you play C major as "x32010" (remember that we wrote "EADGBe" or "654321" strings) you are playing "xCEGCE", the notes of that chord. Note that you even can play the open 6th because you are playing an E that is part of the chord. You could use that "fingering" or whatever "fingering" that selects the same notes. There are also chord inversions but let us leave these things for the next week.

Now, trying to answer your question, you must put each finger in the corresponding fret and string. If you put your fingers in a "mirror" position, first, it is much more difficult (I guess some positions will be impossible) and, second, you will playing another "chord".Alrighty. :) So, x32010 means do not play the top (or thickest) string, but play the rest all the way down, correct?


ReplyQuote
 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 3998
 

Correct, correct and correct! :D


ReplyQuote
(@raevin)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Correct, correct and correct! :D
Ah...AWESOME! :D

So, I have been playing correctly...just my tuning's been wrong. Thanks so much for all the help people!

My spirits have been lifted again! :D


ReplyQuote
(@mrodgers)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 75
 

I've decided to steer away from doing chords though, and just play songs. Yeah, I know they have chords too...but, it's easier for me to learn when I have what I need right in front of me, instead of having to figure it out all the time.

Example:
In this tab of "Silent Night" I got, near the end there's an A-chord you have to play. But, in the tab, it just shows 02220x I can recognize that as an A-chord, but if it just said to play the A-chord I'd have a hard time playing it.

Kinda like math...I can't figure out Physics (because of the story problems it always had), but I can do Calculus-style stuff in a snap of a finger.

Although doing the TV thing is still a good exercise for me. :D
Ok, with reading all this all at once (can't access GN at work :() I am reading into 2 problems that you are questioning here.

Were you just having difficulties with figuring out the chords initially because you didn't quite understand the tab you were using to figure them out? Or, as from previous to most of today's talk, do you just plain not know the chords and are having trouble remembering what fingers to use where?

First off, I am a beginner, bought my guitar in 2005, but put it down after failing to learn move between chords and started messing with TAB as it seems you are. I will say, this is exactly the reason I put the guitar down after 6 months, I never learned anything other than a few intros or easy solos to some songs.

Now, 2.5 years later, I restrung the guitar with determination to learn. I've been doing this for 3 weeks and here's how I am doing it (little at a time since I also have a huge project on the house to do). I looked online for a site that had basically lesson 1, lesson 2, etc.... Each lesson introduced maybe 2 or 3 chords, showed them using a chord diagram, and gave some song examples to play. I can't figure out chords by TAB, but the chord diagrams (shown in your post 3 above here). I'll use G, C, and D as my example as these were my first 3.

Note, I am responding as if you are having a problem with remembering how to finger the chords. I am not very good with switching yet as I still pause quite a bit in my changes. How I learned to remember them is, I put the chord diagrams of the ones in question on top of an Excel file (or Word, anything that can be printed), then I looked at the example songs. Instead of printing that out and worrying about actually playing the song, I listed the chord progressions on my Excel file. Example, Kenny Rogers (my name is Rodgers, hard to type that without the "d", LOL) The Gambler is, and this is how I printed it....

G C G
C G C D
G C G
C D G D
Etc, etc....

I did this for the verse, the chorus, and any other parts that were listed differently. At first I started with just a single down strum per chord, then added 4 down strums per chord for the 4 beats per measure, then moved onto a particular strum pattern. This allows me to practice changing without it being too boring with back and forth repeating of only 2 chords. But, the other thing is, it allowed me to easily memorize the fingerings for these chords since I had the chord chart right there. I was also able to list the chord progressions of several of the suggested practice songs on one sheet. I wasn't worried about learning how to play the songs yet. I just wanted to memorize the chords and work on changing (I still can't change smoothly though).

Doing what I am doing, with 3 weeks of on/off picking up the guitar (due to more important projects of insulating the house because of near $5.00 heating oil...) I have easily and quickly memorized G, C, D, Dm, E, Em, A, and Am.

As I said, I was confused as to what your issue is. Some posts made it seem like you were having trouble figuring out the chords because of trouble reading the TAB of the chord, but other posts led me to believe you were having problems just memorizing the chords in general. So, I hope that my long windedness here (I tend to be long winded on forum posts...) helps at least in some way....


ReplyQuote
(@raevin)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Ok, with reading all this all at once (can't access GN at work :() I am reading into 2 problems that you are questioning here.

Were you just having difficulties with figuring out the chords initially because you didn't quite understand the tab you were using to figure them out? Or, as from previous to most of today's talk, do you just plain not know the chords and are having trouble remembering what fingers to use where?

Ah, sorry to confuse you, lol. Welll, originally it wasn't so much of where to put my fingers, as I can do it just fine individually...it was just more of when I was trying to change from, say, A->Bm. It took me over a minute to place my fingers, and it was just getting frustrating, so yeah...I did go straight to tabs. Which, I'm still gonna do, but start off with like, 3-chord songs ("Wild Thing" is one I REALLY want to play right now).

To be hoenst, I got a little confused with the rest of your post, but I'm also half-awake at my desk right now, lol, so after I wake up some I'll re-read it and see what I can get from it. The main thing that confused me is how you learnt that Kenny Rogers song. I know you just practiced the chords, and played them a lil' faster each time you got a lil' better, but I'm gonna try to word this in a way I can better understand myself, and tell me if I'm correct.

What you do is open up Word, for example, and copy/paste an image of the chord that needs to be played, and do that for the entire song or whatnot, and then you just look at the screen and play what you pasted into the document? If so, it's a pretty good idea. :D Only flaw is possibly not being able to keep a rhythm or beat, but that just depends on how you play it IMO. Please let me know if I'm wrong, though.


ReplyQuote
(@dagwood)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1029
 

If you can afford them I'd suggest getting some lessons or at the very least visit a book store or better yet a music store and get some beginner books for the guitar.

There are many flavors out there all coming to the same relative conclusions:

-basic finger exercises
-basic chords (open chords)
-basic strum and finger style patterns
-finally a few songs interspersed

Finding a good instructor will be invaluable to both your progress and the speed to which you do so.
Additionally, he or she probably works with a few beginner books as a teaching aid and source for you to study and practice with.

Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing. - Wernher Von Braun (1912-1977)


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 3