Skip to content
chords on nylon str...
 
Notifications
Clear all

chords on nylon strings

6 Posts
5 Users
0 Likes
2,268 Views
Sunnydunes
(@sunnydunes)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

Can I ask you all a very broad question? I play on a classical guitar for a few months now, and don't use a plectrum. One thing I noticed is that my chords sound fine when they use five or all six of the strings, but often sound wrong (dead) when I play mostly the top strings. It seems especially difficult to make the F and Dm chords sound right, even if the strings sound fine played by themselves. This got me tinking about the difference between the clear nylon strings (G-, B- and E-) and the metal-wound strings (E- A- and D-). It's like the nylon-only strings need more punch to make them sound, die out quicker, and have a higher 'minimum volume level'. (I get a lot of my practice at times when decent folks can be expected to sleep.) Also, the difference in timbre ( ? ) makes it almost imposible for me to tune my guitar by ear.

What are your experiences with this? Is this about wound and unwound strings or am I just unconciously placing my fingers off? And most of all, how do you make these top string chords ring out all of the time? Is it simply a matter of more practice? Thanks a lot!


   
Quote
Moonrider
(@moonrider)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 1305
 

Can I ask you all a very broad question? I play on a classical guitar for a few months now, and don't use a plectrum. One thing I noticed is that my chords sound fine when they use five or all six of the strings, but often sound wrong (dead) when I play mostly the top strings.

When was the last time you changed your strings?

Playing guitar and never playing for others is like studying medicine and never working in a clinic.

Moondawgs on Reverbnation


   
ReplyQuote
unimogbert
(@unimogbert)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 174
 

This got me tinking about the difference between the clear nylon strings (G-, B- and E-) and the metal-wound strings (E- A- and D-). It's like the nylon-only strings need more punch to make them sound, die out quicker, and have a higher 'minimum volume level'.

I think you have it pretty much right. The plain nylon damps itself out faster than the metal wound strings. Gunky strings might damp out faster but nylon strings don't corrode like metal ones so that's probably not the issue.
The damping is something that lets the high-speed players play so many notes so quickly without sounding muddy.

You could try new strings. Be prepared to have to keep adjusting the new ones for about 5 days straight as they stretch a lot when first installed.

There may also be some technique issues but don't expect those strings to ring for long. Nature of the beast.

Unimogbert
(indeterminate, er, intermediate fingerstyle acoustic)


   
ReplyQuote
Sunnydunes
(@sunnydunes)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

Allright then, I'll learn to live with it. (Maybe become one of those high-speed players. :D )

Also, I've got this guitar for about three month now, but it never crossed my mind to change the strings! I'll give it a try!


   
ReplyQuote
Classico
(@classico)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 65
 

changing the strings is a good idea but i'm afraid that you will see more improvment in the lower strings and might be dissapointed by the results.
two things that i have to add (based on my experience)
1. i'm a classical guitar player and, like everyone, my first guitar was poor. i havn't seen your guitar but you have to consider the possebility that she might be the problem. that is, after you try this:
2. to maximize the potential of the high strings i reccomend that you first take care of your left hand, if you press down right before the frets with the tip of your fingers (when the nails are about 90 degrees to the fret board) your sound and sustain will improve dramaticlly. once you've got that down try picking the strings a bit higher then the sound hole (between the sound hole and the 12th fret) it pruduces a softer more sustainable sound.
have fun with it and i'm sure that you'll get it down 8)


   
ReplyQuote
Alan Green
(@alangreen)
Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5342
 

There may also be some technique issues but don't expect those strings to ring for long. Nature of the beast.

Good trebles will sound out above the basses if you're playing a classical guitar as a classical, but if you're strumming chords then the body construction will load up on bass and middle frequencies.

You should make sure you're strumming parallel to the soundboard - if you're only just skimming the top string but really hitting the bottom string then the sound you produce won't be uniform.

A :-)

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk


   
ReplyQuote