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C#m

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EMT
 EMT
(@emt)
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Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 41
Topic starter  

C#m
is this a C, C minor or some variation of augmented or suspended or something. I can't find it in my book.

thanks

red meat doesn't kill you, fuzzy green meat does.


   
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NoteBoat
(@noteboat)
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C sharp minor - it's C minor played one fret higher

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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Shake Your Bottom
(@shake-your-bottom)
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Joined: 13 years ago
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Use a bar chord. There is no open chord for C#m.

Bass Guitar String


   
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NoteBoat
(@noteboat)
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It's not true that there are no open chords - the pitches are C#, E, and G#. You could play xxx120, xx212x, xx2120, x421xx. x42120 or 042120. There are roughly 100 ways to play any given triad on the guitar, and most of them won't be in chord books.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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EMT
 EMT
(@emt)
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Topic starter  

only been at this for a couple months. So I'm not really good at reading the tab numbers you listed. The sound I get is,,well , kinda flat. I suspect I'm doing it wrong.

red meat doesn't kill you, fuzzy green meat does.


   
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Mahal
(@mahal)
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Like power chords there is the open chord theory popular with Praise leaders from Paul Balouche's teaching. Instead of playing a C#m you would play x46600. Common chords played with C# would be A played x02200, B x 24400, F# played as 2x(or 4)2200 and E played as 079900 0r the first position 022100.


   
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NoteBoat
(@noteboat)
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Instead of playing a C#m you would play x46600.

The open B string makes that a C#m7. Although that can substitute well for C#m, you do have to be a little careful adding notes to chords (particularly if you're part of an ensemble) - I'd go with x466x0 instead.

EMT, the numbers are the frets to play, listed in order from the lowest to highest - and in music, "lowest" always means lowest sounding, so that's actually the string closest to the ceiling :)

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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EMT
 EMT
(@emt)
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Topic starter  

thanks,
next question. the little "o" is playing the cord open right and the "x" is don' play. So If you have an X in the middle of the strum how do you pull that note off w/o hitting the x?
Or is it just a skill you develop that you can skip over that string with the pick.

red meat doesn't kill you, fuzzy green meat does.


   
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Minotaur
(@minotaur)
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thanks,
next question. the little "o" is playing the cord open right and the "x" is don' play. So If you have an X in the middle of the strum how do you pull that note off w/o hitting the x?
Or is it just a skill you develop that you can skip over that string with the pick.

Mute it with the tip of an adjacent finger.

Here's some of the voicings of C#m, choose your poison...

http://jguitar.com/chord?root=C%23&labels=letter&chord=Minor

I'm sure there are plenty more.

A representation of x46654 refers to the frets on the strings, the not played (x) is the 6th string. In tab it looks like this...

E|---4---|
B|---5---|
G|---6---|
D|---6---|
A|---4---|
E|---x---|

Bar the 4th fret then make an Amaj shape on the 5th & 6th frets.

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


   
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Hyperborea
(@hyperborea)
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Mute it with the tip of an adjacent finger.

For strings lower on the fretboard (towards the ceiling but lower pitched) use the tip of the finger on the next higher string but for higher strings angle the finger on a lower string back some so it just touches. In NoteBoat's C#m (x466x0) that's what I would do to mute the B string - angle the finger on the G string back to mute it. Now for the low E string you could mute it with the tip of the finger on the A string but you should also try to not strike it during the strum too.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


   
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clideguitar
(@clideguitar)
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E|---4---|
B|---5---|
G|---6---|
D|---6---|
A|---4---|
E|---x---|

Bar the 4th fret then make an Amaj shape on the 5th & 6th frets.

Think of it as a Bm only 2 frets up.

Bob Jessie


   
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Ande
 Ande
(@ande)
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My impulse for C#minor was x46654, which is the barre chord some have described. x42120 is cool too. Both fingerings are a little tricky, though, and I get the feeling, OP, that you're fairly new to this. (I actively avoided bar chords for several years- just getting the hang of them now, so I understand that you may not be comfy with them yet.)I'm not sure that the fingering is necessarily the problem, though.

You say you're getting flat sounds- what fingering are you using? When you say it sounds flat, do you mean musically flat? (Too deep/low a sound?) Or flat as in dull and lifeless?

If it's the former, you probably have an error in your fingering- post what you're fingering here, using numbers and xs, and somebody will point you in the right direction asap.

If it's lifeless and dull, you may actually have a correct fingering of the chord, and just not have quite the finger strength to make it ring out yet. Again, if you post your fingering here, we can see that. If you've got the right frets and strings in mind, and are still getting sounds you don't like...practice may be key.

And welcome to the boards!

Best,
Ande


   
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Bgdaddy316
(@bgdaddy316)
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Posts: 186
 

It's not true that there are no open chords - the pitches are C#, E, and G#. You could play xxx120, xx212x, xx2120, x421xx. x42120 or 042120. There are roughly 100 ways to play any given triad on the guitar, and most of them won't be in chord books.

Not to hijack, but if these chord variations aren't in chord books, is there a good resource to find them?


   
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David Hodge
(@davidhodge)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 4472
 

The best resource is actually your own brain. If you can remember how any major or minor chord is created, then you can figure out what the notes of that chord are. Then all you have to do is to map out the places on the fingerboard where you can easily access those notes.

A great exercise for students (and one you don't need to have a guitar in hand to do) is to create a fretboard map, complete with notes and to make several copies. Then take one sheet for any given chord and plot out fingerings. This may seem like work (and it is!) but doing this all out yourself increases the odds that the information is going to stick.

We've numerous lessons on this topic here at Guitar Noise, here are some just to get you started:

https://www.guitarnoise.com/lesson/multiple-personality-disorder/

https://www.guitarnoise.com/lesson/but-then-again/

https://www.guitarnoise.com/lesson/moving-on-up/

As Tom says, there are often a hundred-odd possibilities to play any given set of three notes. Putting yourself in the position to understand what they are and how they are made means you'll practically never run out of ideas for chord voicings. Don't let your brain talk you into not being able to do it. It's easier than you think. Moreover, it's fun and you will learn a lot more and remember what you learn even longer if you just do it.

Hope this helps.

Peace


   
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