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complete beginner - age 9

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 lars
(@lars)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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Topic starter  

Maybe I have listened too much to ol' Graham "Teach your children" :?

So, I take it it's not considered a defeat then, to leave it to a teacher even though I should in principle be capable myself. Will have to consider that, it seems.

Thanks

...only thing I know how to do is to keep on keepin' on...

LARS kolberg http://www.facebook.com/sangerersomfolk


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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5134
 

Preserving one's sanity is never a defeat--just wise.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


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(@margaret)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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Larsko wrote: And Margaret ........ whatever happened to Hobbes BTW?
Hobbes' Halloween costume is very clever, no? He's practicing his boogie strut for the party! 8)

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


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(@steeder)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 17
 

Every now and then I like to crawl out from under my Lurker rock and reply...

My wife and I have 3 great kids (3, 8, and 10) who are interested in lots of different things. I think I have experienced with sports what you are now experiencing with music. I have coached my two oldest kids in various sports over the last few years and while it is a lot of fun for me it is sometimes frustrating. They don't see me as Coach. They see me as Dad. For some reason this distinction makes a difference when I try to teach them something. It's hard not to fall into our already established roles which are great for family, but maybe not so effective for structured learning. I think this is part of the reason that kids who go to school where they have a parent who teaches aren't usually assigned to the class the parent teaches.

For me, I think it works better to match the child with a good teacher and then reinforce their learning and interest by spending time with them doing the activity outside of practice (playing catch in the backyard, finding a song to play together, etc).

That's just my own opinion based on my own experience, though. I'm sure others (who are perhaps better teachers than me) have had different experiences.

In any case I think it's very cool that you've passed on your interest in music to your daughter :-)

Steed

Now I can crawl back under my Lurker rock...it's nice and warm under there...


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(@margaret)
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Steeder wrote: Now I can crawl back under my Lurker rock...it's nice and warm under there...
What the heck?! I remembered to use my deodorant today. How 'bout the rest of yous guys? :D

Steeder wrote: For me, I think it works better to match the child with a good teacher and then reinforce their learning and interest by spending time with them doing the activity outside of practice (playing catch in the backyard, finding a song to play together, etc).

Words of wisdom, IMO.

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


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 lars
(@lars)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1121
Topic starter  

Just have to update on this one:

Obviously the time was ripe. She has been very motivated to learn for a while, so once I started drawing some chord diagrams a play some simple songs she was all ears. Now she's practicing some times after school and every now and then I show her something new - today we talked about and played I-V7-I progressions to give a feeling of it. (She know SN and some theory about scales and stuff from playing violin for three years, so things go in real easy)

So cool - and then she asked to try my telecaster - how cool is that?

Looking forward to the rest!! :-D

...only thing I know how to do is to keep on keepin' on...

LARS kolberg http://www.facebook.com/sangerersomfolk


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(@margaret)
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Larsko wrote: and then she asked to try my telecaster - how cool is that?
VERY cool, Larsko! :D

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

yep, very cool - the Tele's pretty nice too!

I tried to get my daughter interested a couple of years ago, she sort of half-heartedly gave it a go for a couple of weeks then gave it up....shame really, she soon mastered the open chords I showed her, if not strumming.....

Now my grandson's pestering me to teach him!

He's a bit more advanced though, already knows most open chords, isn't scared of trying barres, he's one of those kids who seems to pick up things better by being shown rather than being told.....I think he'll do well.....as long as he doesn't pick my bad habits up!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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 geoo
(@geoo)
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as long as he doesn't pick my bad habits up!

Is he really big enough to break plate glass windows? Congrats Larsko on getting the daughter on the guitar. Pretty guitar btw. With mine, I am glad that I got lessons for them. We do our thing at the house and probably break every rule their teachers are teaching them.. but then they also have to practice what the teacher wants. Its win win for me.

Best of luck to you both.

Jim

“The hardest thing in life is to know which bridge to cross and which to burn” - David Russell (Scottish classical Guitarist. b.1942)


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 lars
(@lars)
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Topic starter  

as long as he doesn't pick my bad habits up!

Is he really big enough to break plate glass windows?

LOL!

I'm sure I have a lot of bad habits to teach too. But so far it's been remarkably smooth. I don't have to tell her what to do, instead I say something like: "Do you want to know another chord? It looks like this" or listen to this, doesn't it sound good, this is how you play it, d'you wanna try?

If she keeps on at this speed, she will be better than me in approx. 54 days, but so far things are good without a proper teacher - both the daily scedule and the wallet likes it too :)

...only thing I know how to do is to keep on keepin' on...

LARS kolberg http://www.facebook.com/sangerersomfolk


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(@jminor)
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Joined: 15 years ago
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...and less obstreperous when frustrated...

Great word!!... I had to look this one up

Larsko, gorgeous Tele btw...

Insert random quote here


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(@coloradofenderbender)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1120
 

I have two sons who play instruments - my oldest is 10 years old and has been playing the drums for about two years. He has a very good teacher and has progressed to the point that I cannot play what he can (for the first year I could keep up with him, although I don't play drums). His teacher tells him he is about as good as most of his high school students. So, I leave him alone about the drums, except to remind him when it is time to practice. I don't even go in the room when he is practicing! And that is because he HATED when I tried to help him. He does much better on his own. He also recently picked up bass and I have been helping him here and there and giving him advice, etc. when needed, but from a distance.

His little brother is almost 8 and has been playing guitar for about 1 year. I put him in a program designed specifically for young kids. It is a classical guitar program, and although he really wants to play rock, he is happy just to be learning and playing. He goes to lessons once a week. And unlike my oldest, I sit in with him every time he practices at home. In fact, the program insists that a parent accompany a student to the lesson, so we can help with practice. At first it was a guaranteed fight everytime, but once he realized I may actually know what I am trying to help him with, things have settled in nicely! One nice bonus for me, is that I am learning standard notation along with my son, since the program is taught in it.

I also have a 4 year old daughter who is starting to ask to take piano lessons! She has an electric keyboard in her room and loves to pound on it! We will also send her to an outside teacher, that way she learns the correct way to do things!

So, what am I trying to say, besides the fact that all of these lessons are going to put me in the poor house? I guess it is just that every child is different. It will take a little while until they (and you) settle into a rountine that suits them best. Or, they may just decide after a short while that the instrument is not for them - that's okay too. Each of my sons likes and respects their music teachers as teachers. They love and respect me as their Dad, not their music teacher. I let the teacher and the child plot the course; I am only there to help out where I can.

Being an athlete in school through high school, I can't tell you how many fathers I saw pushing their kids way too hard, getting in the way of what the coach was trying to do, and making their kids miserable! I am sure it is the same with some parents and music. I try to remember that everytime I try to help my kids with their lessons.

Larsko - you may have to invest in one of these!

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Hello-Kitty-Mini?sku=512078

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar?sku=510421

My son has the second one, which he begged to get. He likes to fool around with me sometimes with it.


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(@margaret)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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Larsko wrote: But so far it's been remarkably smooth. I don't have to tell her what to do, instead I say something like: "Do you want to know another chord? It looks like this" or listen to this, doesn't it sound good, this is how you play it, d'you wanna try?

Sounds like you have a nice positive, low-key approach with your daughter. You'll be able to tell when/if it isn't working anymore and if it's time to send her to an outside teacher.

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


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 lars
(@lars)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1121
Topic starter  

Think you have some sound reflections there CFB!

Larsko - you may have to invest in one of these!

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Hello-Kitty-Mini?sku=512078

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar?sku=510421

Yeah, they are pretty cool - apink for my daughter and a black for my son :-D
L

...only thing I know how to do is to keep on keepin' on...

LARS kolberg http://www.facebook.com/sangerersomfolk


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(@anonymous)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

i approach teaching like this. she's the one that's learning. that's what it's about. it's not about you teaching. you're just there to help her learn.
patience is easy. do you have somewhere else you'd rather be? also, remember, if she sucks, it's your dna. :D and your spouse's, whom you chose.


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