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Crazy dose of reality!

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(@70chevelle)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 35
Topic starter  

I was at a family function this weekend. I have been feeling pretty good about my progress, since I've been able to start picking up some more difficult tabs pretty quick. Well, while at this function, filled with young adults 20-25, who are all musicians, I was blown away. They sat down in the family room with an upright piano, electric guitar, acoustic electric, an organ, and a bass. Called a few keys and/or chords and off they went. One is a concert violinist, at around 22 years old. He started on the bass and then started playing solos on the acoustic electric. It was impressive. And they all pretty much moved from instrument to instrument. I was just explaining to my wife the other day, that I am really learning to play songs on the guitar, not really learning to play the guitar. She didn't understand until she saw these guys going at it. It's given me a entirely new outlook on theory. Still not sure if this was a good experience or not, but I did enjoy being there.


   
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(@mikey)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 329
 

I'm sure it was a good experience.

You've witnessed the difference between just playing music and being a musician.

You've witnessed the difference between just knowing notes and tab and knowing theory and putting that knowledge to use.

Now that you've witnessed these differences, which side of the equation do you wish to be on?

Don't get down on yourself though because that will make it a bad experience and it wasn't. These guys have years of music experience on you. You can't judge yourself against them. Would be great if you could tap into their knowledge though. Wish I had something like that.

Mike

Playing an instrument is good for your soul


   
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(@rahul)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2736
 

And all those actually belong to your family ?


   
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(@70chevelle)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 35
Topic starter  

I'll chalk it up as a good experience. It's probably better that it happened now, instead of sometime in the future, when I may think I'm actually good :lol:

They are actually part of my wifes family. 2 of them are brothers, and are very musically inclined. As I said originally, the younger brother is a concert violinist and has played all the US and also in Europe at 22.


   
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(@redpoint)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 210
 

So what can we do to get to that level? :)


   
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(@kingpatzer)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2171
 

In my mind the first level is being able to read music well.

That's a skill that takes several years on any instrument, and is somewhat complicated on the guitar because notes appear in so many places.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


   
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(@jimmy_kwtx)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 115
 

In my mind the first level is being able to read music well.

That's a skill that takes several years on any instrument, and is somewhat complicated on the guitar because notes appear in so many places.

I beg to differ. Reading the music is the easy part. Applying the notes to the instrument is the hard part.

You only have to worry about 7 notes (A-G) it repeats and with FACE and EGBDF for the staff.

With Guitar ( I played 4 different musical instruments before picking up the GTR) I found it was easier -- to me-- to deal with patterns and just "mastered" the first 4 frets. Every thing past the 4th is just repitition IMHO.


   
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(@70chevelle)
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Redpoint - I know in my case, nothing. They both started playing instruments at young ages, 5 or so. And they enjoyed it. I took piano lessons when I was young, hated it, and wanted to play baseball, football, and wrestle. I'm pretty sure I could hold my own with them in baseball, football, and could "school" them in wresting. Different paths.


   
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(@robbie)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 453
 

70Chevelle.. your answer to Redpoint brings to mind my going back to university 15 years ago at the age of 45. I was scared to death, how could I possibly compete with these young whippersnappers..they were competent in science math etc. and I had forgotten most everything that I was taught when I went to school, right? Well nothing ventured as they say and I soon found that I had a dedication and desire that was lacking in the overall student population. I did not have to entertain and party on the weekends, just do my assignments and study. I soon found that I was the guy in front of the pack and graduated "With Distinction". I guess what I am trying to say is that if you try you might be supprised to discover what you are capable of achieving. I realize that your relatives have a big head start but give it a go. You are capable of closing the gap significantly. They will also likely be a terrific resource to draw on. Jumping off my soapbox now!
Robbie


   
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(@redpoint)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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I think almost everyone feels like you're starting too late. I'm in my mid-20s, and I've been playing guitar a year. I think Robbies right - anyone can close the gap significantly. (Not only do I have to do that with guitar, but with piano as well :) I'd love to be able to write and perform music of my own, and I think it'll definitely happen (ideally, yesterday, but realistically, probably a few more years). Anyhow, it keeps me busy!


   
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(@tim_madsen)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 724
 

I started playing when I was 50 and am 53 now. I'm sure I could have joined right in with that group if they where calling out the chords (I'm no naturally born guitar wizard). I was joining jams like that after about 6 months of practice. It's not as hard as it seems once you've mastered several basic chords and some strum patterns. Now after three years I could throw in some fills and solo or two. It just takes practice and one of the best kinds is playing with other people. Take your guitar next time and join in. If they play something beyond your level stop until you can join back in. Or buy a egg shaker and keep the beat with it until they play something you can handle (the egg shaker will help with developing your timing). Just incase you don't know a egg shaker is a plastic egg shaped instrument that's filled with stuff to make a noise. It will fit in your pocket and is a handy inexpensive thing to have. I would call your experience a good one. Don't be intimidated if you can't join in now your not far off, jamming is not as hard as it seems. Practice those chords every day :!: And have fun that's the important part :wink:

Tim Madsen
Nobody cares how much you know,
until they know how much you care.

"What you keep to yourself you lose, what you give away you keep forever." -Axel Munthe


   
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(@70chevelle)
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Topic starter  

Robbie & Redpoint - thanks for the encouragement. I started this journey wanting to learn with my youngest daughter. She is her dad reincarnated, and also would rather be outside playing than practicing guitar. Her loss may be my gain, and I still encourage her to learn to play, but I refuse to force her as was done to me. Could end up with the same result either way? Anyway, my gameplan is to be able to play music that I enjoy for friends and family. I am well beyond the age of wanting to be a rock star. This is a purely self motivated hobby. My wife is a teacher with a masters in psychology(sp?), and proclaimed me to be the poster child for adult ADD, and OCD. I enjoy many things, golf, hunting, training my hunting dog, woodworking, cars (see screenname), and motorcycles. The list goes on and on, and once I dedicate myself, it's on! I've been playing since early January, and I play every day unless I am away from home. My first guitar was a Yamaha gigmaker package, and within 2 months I had to have a better one and picked up a Seagull S6 GT. At a recital for my oldest daughter, up and coming singer :wink: , I listened to someone playing a Gibson Hollow Body and liked the sounds. I have a want for the following, Oscar Schmidt OE30 & tube amp, Taylor 310, and since I love woodworking, I've been looking at kits to make my own. It's exciting just typing about it. I do have a few projects that need attention, but I can always hammer on the guitar when I come in from the shop to relax. :wink: I guess I've exposed my illness.


   
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