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Determining chords in a key

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(@anonymous)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Topic starter  

I used to have a page where it said what chords are in what key, but I lost it. So I was wondering, you know how you can build a scale with some pattern, I can't remember what it is. Say for example you knew the key was F minor. Is there anyway or pattern to figure out what the chords are for the key, or any other key?


   
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(@b0ttleneck)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Try this, I dont remember where I got it, but it was a big help for me.


   
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(@bennett)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 297
 

I believe David wrote about it in his Open Tunings II lesson.

Hope that helps. :)

From little things big things grow - Paul Kelly


   
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(@greybeard)
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To find the harmonised chords, to a key, you can see here how they come about. The sequence always comes out the same Maj, min, min, Maj, Maj, min, dim. You can use the logic in the table to find the harmonised chords for any scale.
The relative minor starts at the 6th degree of it's relative major scale, so the sequence (for the relative minor scale) starts there - min, dim, Maj, min, min, Maj, Maj.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
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(@misanthrope)
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My flash tool for that is online here, or downloadable here (Win) or here (Mac)

ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


   
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(@pearlthekat)
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the pattern to build a scale is whole, whole half, whole, whole, whole, half. don't know if this is what you meant or not.


   
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(@anonymous)
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Topic starter  

Ok, let me see if I understand this. And someone please answer, seems like everytime I ask a second question on a thread, I don't get an answer.

Ok, so the pattern is min, dim, Maj, min, min, Maj, Maj. So for say F minor which is F, G, Ab, Bb, C, Db, Eb the chords would be

F minor
G diminished
Ab Major
Bb minor
C minor
Db Major
Eb Major

Is that right?


   
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(@bennett)
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Yes ... AFAIK.

Sorry if you didn't get an anwer previously in this thread. :?

From little things big things grow - Paul Kelly


   
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(@hbriem)
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Ok, so the pattern is min, dim, Maj, min, min, Maj, Maj. So for say F minor which is F, G, Ab, Bb, C, Db, Eb the chords would be

F minor
G diminished
Ab Major
Bb minor
C minor
Db Major
Eb Major

Is that right?

Yes, you are absolutely right, those are the chords for the natural minor (Aeolian mode). They are like the chords for the relative major, but rearranged.

However, in minor keys it is more common to use a major or dominant V (this is called harmonic minor). This means that instead of C minor you'd use C major or C7. Of course, it's quite common to use both in the same song.

Occasionally, minor key songs use a major IV chord as well (Bb major instead of Bbm). This would be called melodic major (major IV and V) or Dorian mode (major IV, minor V).

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


   
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