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Double Stops with one finger

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(@rgalvez)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 717
Topic starter  

I'm working with some jazzy chords learned from Ted Greene's books, and I'm struggling with the so-called 'double stops' but played witht the same finger: In the tab below I have to play both the fourth and fifth string (5th fret) with the middle finger, but taking care not to mute the third string (4th fret) played by the index finger, and allowing the pinky to reach the second string (7th fret).

E---------------X------------------
B---------------7------------------
G---------------4------------------
D---------------5-------------------
A---------------5------------------
E---------------X-------------------

According to Greene it's a just matter to practice to handle this technique, but before I get frustrated I want to ask our dear gurus here if they can give me some tips.
Cheers
Roberto


   
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(@hyperborea)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 827
 

Wow, that was pretty tough - I just went off and tried that. I can sort of get it but not quickly, reliably, and cleanly. I think with practice it would come just like bending back the ring finger for partial barres to miss the first string.

How do you like Ted Greene's books? I've seen references to them before (Chord Chemistry, etc) but never actually seen one in person. Are they good? What do you need to know going in? Thanks.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


   
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(@steinar-gregertsen)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 503
 

Surgery? :wink: I just tried it and it was indeed a tough one (i.e. I couldn't do it..). Any reason to not use the ring finger on string 4? Felt quite natural to me....

Steinar

"Play to express, not to impress"
Website - YouTube


   
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(@vic-lewis-vl)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 10264
 

You could try playing the chord a different way - you've got D G B and F# notes in there, so taking G as the root, you've got a G maj 7th chord which you could do as xx0002 - or 320002, if you were so inclined.....sounds almost exactly the same, and it's far easier to fret!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
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(@hyperborea)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 827
 

You could try playing the chord a different way - you've got D G B and F# notes in there, so taking G as the root, you've got a G maj 7th chord which you could do as xx0002 - or 320002, if you were so inclined.....sounds almost exactly the same, and it's far easier to fret!

This probably won't work. In a certain kind of jazz chord playing you want to keep minimal movement between chords so that chords played one after the other share as of the same timbre as possible (same string and same fret). It gives a smoother more flowing sound.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


   
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(@rgalvez)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 717
Topic starter  

You could try playing the chord a different way - you've got D G B and F# notes in there, so taking G as the root, you've got a G maj 7th chord which you could do as xx0002 - or 320002, if you were so inclined.....sounds almost exactly the same, and it's far easier to fret!

This probably won't work. In a certain kind of jazz chord playing you want to keep minimal movement between chords so that chords played one after the other share as of the same timbre as possible (same string and same fret). It gives a smoother more flowing sound.

Thanks a lot for your input Vic!! but yes, it is what Hyperborea says, these shapes are made in that way so you can have a nice, melodic chordal approach without too major movements from the hand. (ie voice leading). I got one example from Ted green's 'Modern Chord Progressions ' but there are plenty of them and Ted only advices to have 'patience and determination' with these difficult shapes, that's why it would be interesting to have some feedback from our jazzy cats here.
And, Hyperborea, yes, Ted Greene' books are really good additions to your collection if you're really interested in jazz/or digging more into chords and harmony.
Below is the subject in which I received some nice comments about Chord Chemistry:

http://forums.guitarnoise.com/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=28564&p=258697&hilit=+TED+GREENE#p258697

cheers
Roberto


   
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(@vic-lewis-vl)
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Oh well - it was just a thought. I'm a great believer in not complicating things unnecessarily! I suppose it would make a difference to the overall sound, especially depending on which chords come before and after the Gmaj7. I did try both variations, though, and found very little difference tone- and timbre-wise - oh well, maybe it's time for the yearly ear-syringing session!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
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(@rgalvez)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Topic starter  

Oh well - it was just a thought. I'm a great believer in not complicating things unnecessarily!
:D :D :D

Vic
You're right. !! specially now that I think I will leave this jazz thing for a while and I will go back to The Ramones stuff !! ;)))


   
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(@vic-lewis-vl)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 10264
 

There's another way of playing that particular (Gmaj7) chord, somewhere near where you're already playing it; x55777. That's a similar tone, though slightly fuller, to the x5547x with the added advantage of not tying your fingers in knots!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
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(@ricochet)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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oh well, maybe it's time for the yearly ear-syringing session!If you see brain coming out, use less pressure. :D

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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(@rgalvez)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 717
Topic starter  

By the way for those curious about Ted Greene and his approach to chord voicings (the basics of Chord Chemistry) here is a classic Greene's lesson for Guitar Player . Enjoy!

http://www.guitarplayer.com/article/vibrant-voicings/Oct-05/14350


   
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