Skip to content
Notifications
Clear all

Easiest chords.

13 Posts
11 Users
0 Likes
1,869 Views
maisie.
(@maisie)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 11
Topic starter  

Which are the easiest chords for beginners? Like one fingered, or even two fingered?

P.S please could you explain where you put your fingers because I struggle reading charts. Thanks. :note2:


   
Quote
Nuno
 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3995
 

Hi Maisie,

Did you already read the lessons on the main site? There is section with Easy Songs where you will find songs with more or less 'easy chords'.

Perhaps a teacher or a good instruction book on guitar could be useful as well.

And welcome to GN!


   
ReplyQuote
KR2
 KR2
(@kr2)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 2717
 

Probably the two easiest chords are A minor (written as Am) and E

Both require the same three fingers and the fingering is similar.

For the Am chord:
-Index finger on the second string at the first fret
(Strings are numbered 1 through 6 . . . 1 is the thinnest string)
(Fingers are also numbered . . . but I won't go there)

-Middle finger is on the 3rd string at the second fret
-Ring finger is on the 4th string also at the second fret

Look at the chord chart to see how the chart relates to what I'm writing . . . you'll see the connection.

The E chord . . . everything is the same just shifted up (towards the ceiling . . . lower in tone since the string are thicker)
-Index finger on the 3rd string at the first fret
-Middle finger is on the 4th string at the second fret
-Ring finger is on the 5th string also at the second fret

You'll know if you have the fingering correct because when you strum the strings it should have a harmonious sound.

These are usually the very first chords player learn . . . and a good start for being able to change back and forth between chords as you strum.

It's going to be hard to change chords fast enough to play a song . . . at first.
Don't get frustrated . . . you won't be able to do it in a matter of days . . . it's more like a matter of weeks or months.

Don't over practice.
It takes time for your fingers to get used to being used in a new way.

Your fingers will gradually get used to it and it takes time to build the strength and dexterity.

Remember when you first learned to write?
You weren't able to write like you can now when you first started . . .
that took years to develop . . . same thing with learning the guitar . . .
. . . you learn by doing . . . if you don't do, you won't learn.

KR2

It's the rock that gives the stream its music . . . and the stream that gives the rock its roll.


   
ReplyQuote
kent_eh
(@kent_eh)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1882
 

Sounds like you are a perfect candidate for David's lesson entitled Absolute Beginner Part 1: Chords.

Among the things that David teaches in that lesson are 8 of the easiest chords there are. And how to read those chord charts.
He also points the way to some of the next lessons you might want to look at.

I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I looked like I was deep


   
ReplyQuote
Hanging Chord
(@hanging-chord)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 87
 

Isn't the easiest chord to play G6add9? :lol:


   
ReplyQuote
kent_eh
(@kent_eh)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1882
 

Isn't the easiest chord to play G6add9? :lol:

It's easier to play it than it is to say it... :wink:

I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I looked like I was deep


   
ReplyQuote
greybeard
(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

The easiest chord is an Em11 - you play all the open strings!

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
ReplyQuote
hbriem
(@hbriem)
Honorable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 646
 

Jokes aside, I figured out a way to play the I (E), IV (A) and V (B) in E major with only 1 finger (with a little leeway). You can use any finger you like, I prefer index or middle.

E is like this:

e|------x------
B|------x------
G|------x------
D|------2------
A|------2------
E|------0------

Yes, I know it's strictly speaking an E5 or E power chord. You strum only the bottom 3 strings and try to mute the 4th (G). If you accidentally don't you get an Esus4. Not the end of the world.

A is like this, same finger, one string up:

e|------x------
B|------2------
G|------2------
D|------2------
A|------0------
E|------x------

Again, try to mute or avoid striking the high E string. If you don't you get an A6. Not the end of the world.

B is like this, same finger, two frets up:

e|------x------
B|------4------
G|------4------
D|------4------
A|------0------
E|------x------

Yes, strictly speaking it's a B7/A (3rd inversion). If you accidentally don't mute the high E string you get a B13. Not the end of the world.

Works well for 12 bar blues and several easy riffs using this fingering sound so authentic I'm certain a lot of real blues is played this way. Enjoy.

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


   
ReplyQuote
Nick Torres
(@nicktorres)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 5381
 

C and G7

one finger on the first fret of the B string for C
one finger on the first fret of the high E string for G7

that doesn't get you much however. Read the absolute beginners lesson on chords. It only takes a week or two until your fingers stop hurting.


   
ReplyQuote
rparker
(@rparker)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5480
 

C and G7

one finger on the first fret of the B string for C
one finger on the first fret of the high E string for G7

that doesn't get you much however. Read the absolute beginners lesson on chords. It only takes a week or two until your fingers stop hurting.

You get the opening for the Stones' "Heart Of Stone". :)

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


   
ReplyQuote
Sin City Sid
(@sin-city-sid)
Prominent Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 735
 

And you can't forget the ever so easy E5 and A5 :D

Yeah, yeah, I know they are not really chords but close enough.


   
ReplyQuote
tsoltrs
(@tsoltrs)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 7
 

If you reeaaaalllly want a cheap and easy way to learn chords then do drop D tuning and simply hold a bar to any fret and you'll have a chord. A lot of bands do it these days because it's easy to play while performing plus it has a deeper sound. Won't do much for your guitar cred but definately an easy option to do. I would'nt recommend doing it right away though. Learn your standard chords first.

Forget music school! Learn guitar on video!
http://tsoltrs.guitarhot.hop.clickbank.net/


   
ReplyQuote
hbriem
(@hbriem)
Honorable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 646
 

If you reeaaaalllly want a cheap and easy way to learn chords then do drop D tuning and simply hold a bar to any fret and you'll have a chord.

With drop-D tuning you get a 5th chord if you strum only the bottom 3 strings. If you strummed all 6 strings you'd get D-A-D-G-B-E, a fairly nasty sounding melange of notes (D=1, A=5, D=8, G=11, B=13, E=9). It would probably sound more like a G 6/9 than any kind of D.

Of course this is used all the time, you just strum 2 or 3 strings.

To get a chord on all 6 strings you'd need to tune to open D (DADF#AD), open G (DGDGBD) or open E (EBEG#BE) for example.

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


   
ReplyQuote