Skip to content
Every breath you ta...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Every breath you take help

6 Posts
4 Users
0 Likes
2,725 Views
jase36
(@jase36)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 247
Topic starter  

Ive been running through on my acoustic every breath you take from the guitar riffs section. I can manage the 5 fret stretch from the fifth fret to the ninth and from the 7th to the 11th. I'm struggling to stretch from the 2nd to the 6th. Im able to play it all the way through at a modest 60bpm but I'm wondering if I'm playing it correctly. Rather than holding a shape and letting the notes ring out I'm playing as you would a scale and releasing each note as the next one is played. This way makes It easier for me to make the harder stretches but it does sound a little choppy and I wonder if I should actually be letting the notes ring out. I've looked through you tube and cant decide which is correct. I'm not bothered about adding palm muting yet or effects but would like to try to play it right , does anyone know how it should be played correctly?

http://www.youtube.com/user/jase67electric


   
Quote
David Hodge
(@davidhodge)
Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 4472
 

If "correctly" means "just like the original recording" then you're going to want to hang on to every note for the duration and that's not easy to do. This is a perfect example of an artist using his or her natural gifts as far as playing. Andy Summers has huge hands and has no trouble handling these changes at speed (or faster - check out the same basic chord voicings in Message in a Bottle).

Those of us (me included) whose hands don't work like that will always have to find some way to compensate if we want to sound exactly like the original recording. It's basically a matter of anatomy at this point.

One thing that I've experimented with in the past in regard to this song is working it out in a different key (allowing for the use of open strings) or working it out in a slightly altered tuning (which involves refiguring some chords, particularly in the bridge). Both strategies have allowed me to sound closer to the original recording, but again, not exactly.

So if you're young and still growing, you've got a chance. If you've not worked your hands to their fullest stretching potential, you've also got a chance. If you're old and short-fingered (like some of the GN Moderators), then you simply accept and compromise.

Hope this helps.

Peace


   
ReplyQuote
jase36
(@jase36)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 247
Topic starter  

Thanks David, at 41 I can only hope that there is a little bit more stretch still to get . I'm using the song more as an exercise to stretch my hand rather than to be able to play like the original. Its one of those songs that I've always known but since trying to play it just appreciate it so much more.

http://www.youtube.com/user/jase67electric


   
ReplyQuote
mmoncur
(@mmoncur)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 168
 

I treat "Every Breath You Take" as a stretching exercise too. My teacher had me play it by moving the first finger while holding the others in place - for example:

- 1st finger, 6th string, 4th fret
- 2nd finger, 5th string, 6th fret
- 4th finger, 4th string, 8th fret
- 2nd finger, 5th string, 6th fret
- 1st finger, 3rd string, 5th fret

Sorry, I'm too lazy to make that into tab, but the first finger moves from the 6th string to the 3rd to cover both notes, fingers 2 and 4 hold their position through the entire measure, and all of the notes have a chance to ring out.

It's still quite a stretch - when I started with it it was painful to play it at all, now it's OK but I'm not quite up to speed. I can also stretch my fingers into position to hold the entire chords now, but THAT really HURTS so I'll stick to my way.

Note: my fret numbers are off by 1 from the lesson here, I think mine are the key of the original recording.


   
ReplyQuote
jeffster1
(@jeffster1)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 231
 

I'm going to respectfully disagree with dhodge on this. I have the smallest hands in the world and I can make that and similar stretches. It's a matter of technique and practice. I always recommend the outro solo to Floods by Pantera as a good stretching exercise.

Edit: I'm pretty sure a 4 fret stretch is possible for any hand size from any neck position.


   
ReplyQuote
David Hodge
(@davidhodge)
Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 4472
 

No problems about disagreement! I think that it's actually five frets (I usually count the fret I'm starting on) and with concentrated practice one can certainly develop the ability to stretch out that far. Then it's a matter of doing it at will and in tempo.

All of which is evidence that I need to practice a lot more! :wink: After all, I managed to get myself able to do it for Blackbird...

Peace


   
ReplyQuote