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(@deanobeano)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 127
Topic starter  

I held my guitar close to my amp today to get feedback like i saw jimim hendrix do and i was wondering if this can cause damage to my amp ? Thanx


   
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(@paul-donnelly)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1066
 

No, you're fine. Just be careful of your ears. 8)


   
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(@ghost)
Prominent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 815
 

I had to turn my amp away from me 'cause of the feedback. :shock:

"If I had a time machine, I'd go back and tell me to practise that bloody guitar!" -Vic Lewis

Everything is 42..... again.


   
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(@dcarroll)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 216
 

lots of feedback can be hard on an amp, especially old tube amps. This probably due to the fact that when your getting great feedback your amp is dimed.

Who cares though, turn it on 10 and let it rip :)

I've been imitated so well I've heard people copy my mistakes.
- Jimi Hendrix


   
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(@paul-donnelly)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1066
 

lots of feedback can be hard on an amp, especially old tube amps.
I was thinking he's using a smaller solid state amp. Some amps can get damaged like that, but I wouldn't expect a small SS amp to.


   
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(@forrok_star)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 2337
 

Yes, uncontrolled feedback can harm the amp. The trick is to get control of it at any volume. The way I have my rig setup allows me to utilize feedback when I feel its useful and have control of it even at lower volumes. 90% of the time I'm driving a 100 watt tube amp into a dummy load as a preamp combined with numerous rack mounted equalizers and tube processors. Even when I'm using a small watt all tube I use an attenuator and a few equalizers. The amps is running at their saturation point right on the edge.

Joe


   
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(@dcarroll)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 216
 

you'll find that certain notes on your guitar hit the resonant frequencies and will feeback super easy, and other notes will barely feedback at all. just gotta find the sweet spot.

I've been imitated so well I've heard people copy my mistakes.
- Jimi Hendrix


   
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(@gnease)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5038
 

Each note will feed back at various distances from the amp. While performing, three simple ways to control feedback (once you've established the distance between guitar and amp) are

1. twist away from the amp -- changes distance and amount of feedback signal reaching the guitar.
2. subtly alter the distance between guitar and amp, but without twisting.
3. bend the string -- even slight changes in the frequency will change the feedback characteristic

Learning to control feedback with bending is especially satisfying, as it gives one an intimate sense of dynamic control.

-=tension & release=-


   
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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 6348
 

dimed. (as in amp being dimed)

Ive heard that before. what does it mean?

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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(@forrok_star)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 2337
 

I recall it being a term when you adjust the volume to 10.

joe


   
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(@ricochet)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

You can't damage a tube amp that way. Speakers are another matter.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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