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Few beginner questions


(@cookiedude)
Active Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 10
Topic starter  

Long story short, I have decided to learn to play the guitar. I am really excited about it, but at the moment I don't have too much money (I hope to get a job later today). Since I don't have enough money, I can't exactly buy one today, or else I would, but instead I have to wait a month or two until I have thrown together enough money to get a good "first guitar." For now, I have a few questions:

1 - I am really excited about playing the guitar, so I want to know what I can do, read, research, memorize, etc. now that will hopefully help once I have finally gotten the guitar.

2 - As of today, I am saving up for the guitar that I hope to get in a month or so, and right now I have around $180, which I know isn't even close to enough to get an adequate "first guitar." If anyone has any suggestions on how much I should save up before getting the guitar, that would be great.

3 - What would be a good first guitar for me? I don't really care about a really expensive amp right now, since I don't plan on playing anywhere where I will need to be THAT loud, but any suggestions for guitars, amps, or packages with both would help a lot.


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(@rob-l)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 62
 

C-Dude,

If you're looking for an acoustic, which is what many people start with, $200 will get you a decent starter guitar. I know Squier and Ibanez have beginner electric packages at that price range also. Don't know myself how good they are but I've heard others say they were great to get started on. In the meantime you can learn some chords(E,E minor, D, C,A,A minor) to use when you're in the store trying guitars out. Also check out some basic music theory, there are plenty of articles here at GN.

Good luck,
Rob

Well I got this guitar and I'm tryin' to learn how to make it talk.


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(@odiewon)
Eminent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 31
 

Welcome to GN!! I'm fairly new here too, but this is a great place to learn from all different types of guitarists.

There are lots of good articles and threads to read here, about beginning to learn to play. Take some time and really browse around, and you'll see what I mean.

My first two guitars were both gifts. The second one is a Fender acoustic, it's a DG-11. It seems like a great beginner guitar to me. Sounds good, plays good, I love it. I saw them at Mars Music (before they went under) for $169 once. I believe that a couple hundred dollars is more than enough to get a decent start.

Take your time, learn some chords, and pick up and play those chords on as many different guitars as possible. Before long you'll be able to feel the differences between them, and your ear will be able to hear the differences in tone as well. Then it will become much easier to choose.

:D

"Never holster an unloaded weapon, it's just poor form." - Col. Jeff Cooper


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(@goodvichunting)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 327
 

My sincere advise would be to invest your $180 into a decent acoustic and get started on playing as soon as you possibly can.

2 months of inactivity coupled with doses of music theory will easliy subdue or even kill your urge to learn guitar.

just my 2 cents ...

Cheers

Latest addition: Cover of "Don't Panic" by Coldplay
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=502670


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(@olive)
Estimable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 126
 

You might also consider purchasing a used guitar. Here is an article on how to shop for a used acoustic:

https://www.guitarnoise.com/article.php?id=418

"My ex-boyfriend can't tell me I've sold out, because he's in a cult, and he's not allowed to talk to me." --Dar Williams


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(@sagaciouskjb2)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 66
 

I'm not too sure why most people reccomend acoustic over electric for a first guitar. I started out 7 months ago with an electric. The biggest hurdle was just figuring out how to get it to sound good with the tone, volume, amp settings, etc. But someone's got to know something I don't, so I'll just not comment on that part.

But, before you get it, I'd work on learning how to read music, about keys, scales, and other things concerning music theory. Also, I'd try to brush up on termonology. I still find it hard for me to learn theory stuff simply because I don't know the difference between harmony and melody.


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(@spacedog03)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 120
 

Read any articles under “beginner” at this site as you can but absolutely DO NOT get bogged down by anything you don’t understand. Because some of it won't make sense till you start playing, and even then some things take a while. (Or maybe I'm just dense. ) Like any second (or third or forth) language it soaks in gradually.
Try to get your hands on a guitar sooner rather than later. You do not need something expensive to be worthwhile. Many of those beginner packages are pretty good to start. They really are, as long as they are not some totally unknown manufacturer. If you see something you like look it up first, try to find some reviews of it online, (though many will actually be sales blurbs rather than objective reviews). As for amps, I got a Fender Frontman 25R a year ago for about $150. I am pleased with it but could have gone with something even a little cheaper and smaller. It is actually quite loud when I need it to be.

One advantage to an acoustic over an electric to start is its portability. You can take it to any room in the house, or outside, without having to lug a bunch of gear around. This is great if you haven’t established certain practice routines or you want to practice for short periods when you get a few minutes here or there. If your guitar is available whenever and wherever you want to practice you will be more inclined to keep picking it up whenever you can. Of course I do this with my unplugged electric, even though it doesn’t sound like much.
Welcome to the site. Come back and ask questions. Always someone here knows the answer.


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(@u2bono269)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1188
 

Acoustics also kinda force you to play correctly. The strings are heavier and there's more tension, so you build up strength and callouses quicker. On an electric, the distortion and the pickups can hide your mistakes and kinda gloss over them so they're not as obvious. On an acoustic, you know when you're doing something that's not right, and you can fix it. I always recommend that you start on acoustic.

http://www.brianbetteridge.com


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(@call_me_kido)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 188
 

Hey,

My first guitar was a 1986 American Strat. And all I can say is that until I got my Guild Acoustic I hadnt really played much of anything.

Going from the electric to acoustic was difficult because the action was higher, the strings were (much) heavier, bending was nearly impossible. I definately wish I had started on an acoustic first and transitioned to electric instead.

Long story short, once I had played acoustic for a while, I found myself playing more, doodling with knobs less. Also playing my electrics was a breeze after getting strength and agility from daily practice with an acoustic, which in my opinion is a little more difficult. You wont see me shredding scales on it, but for learning your rythm, chords and scales I would go with acoustic all the way and 200.00 is more then enough to get a decent one.

Some people would definately swear by an electric, but youll see more one man shows weilding an acoustic then an electric anyday, and when youre at your beginning stages you probably wont be jamming out with bands much until you learn some things.

For your money you can also get a really good acoustic for much less or a great one for the same price as an electric, an amp, chords etc.

My 25 cents

Kido


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(@metaellihead)
Honorable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 653
 

Weird. I've never had immense problems doing bends and stuff on my accoustic. Maybe I'm a freak? Or maybe it's cause I've spent almost all my time on technique rather than learning lots of songs?

Hammer-on's and pull-off's still sound lame, but that's just the way accoustics are. Bah, I need to get an electric...

-Metaellihead


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(@cookiedude)
Active Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 10
Topic starter  

Thanks a lot for all the help guys.

As for acoustic or electric - I don't really know, but acousic just seems.... boring, compared to an electric, but that's just my opinion. Also, I just got hired at Burger King (hey, I'm 16 and need the money), so in a couple weeks hopefully I'll have plenty of money to spend on the guitar. Until then, I'll just read up on the beginner stuff and try to memorize some chords.


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 Taso
(@taso)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2852
 

cookie, what kind of music do you want to play? thats pretty important... I'm assuming a squire begginer pack would be great for you..comes with guitar, amp, and some other stuff. squires get a bad name, but they arent half bad at all.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


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(@cookiedude)
Active Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 10
Topic starter  

Well, I want to be able to play some of my favorite songs in the long run, which are all Melodic Death Metal. In Flames is my favorite band, so I ultimately want to be able to play music like theirs.


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