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G Major Scale

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Markyb87
(@markyb87)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Topic starter  

Hi I have a guitar book i use for my practice that has A,Am and C major
scales in it, but I don't have any info on the G major Scale?? can anyone
tell me if there is a page on this site that has the G major scale explained in detail?

Thanks for your Help

Mark


   
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Nils
 Nils
(@nils)
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stock28
(@stock28)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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If you have the A major, you have every major scale. For the G major, just move the scale up the neck two frets and you're there.


   
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Markyb87
(@markyb87)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Topic starter  

Cheers Guys, sorry for the late reply. That will help me no end.

Thanyou very much.

Mark


   
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undercat
(@undercat)
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If you have the A major, you have every major scale. For the G major, just move the scale up the neck two frets and you're there.

Wouldn't that be down two frets?

Assuming you're talking about starting on the 'A' on the 6th string, you'd be decending two frets in pitch to make your G.

Do something you love and you'll never work a day in your life...


   
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hbriem
(@hbriem)
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Yes, undercat has it right.

Movement in music is always by pitch, not physical position.

Thus you move down from A to G, even though physically you might be moving up the neck towards the headstock. What if you hold the guitar differently?

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


   
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stock28
(@stock28)
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You are correct in talking pitch. However, I stated move the scale up the neck two frets in position and that would be the correct position. Seemed like an easier way to eplain it at the time. Point is he understands it now.


   
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greybeard
(@greybeard)
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I think that we have a discrepancy in what different people call "up". It seems that some regard it as moving from the bridge to the neck and others reckon it's the other way.
I would argue that, as you are moving in ascending pitch and fret number, "up" is from the nut to the bridge.

That being the case, moving from A to G is moving "down" 2 frets.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
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stock28
(@stock28)
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I retract my previous posts. Greybeard, you are correct and that is what I meant. I confused myself. Still, I think he figured it out. Thanks for pointing that out.


   
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greybeard
(@greybeard)
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Hakuna Matata - don't worry about it.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
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hairballxavier
(@hairballxavier)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Hi I have a guitar book i use for my practice that has A,Am and C major
scales in it, but I don't have any info on the G major Scale??

Wow. Looks like they want you to buy another book for the other scales. I'd suggest to throw that book away. It was probably written by a piano player and will only confuse you and hinder your progress.


   
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