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Getting a country feel

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Evolution
(@evolution)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 150
Topic starter  

So I'm performing a "Teach Your Children", but I usually don't play country and can get the song to sound right. There is a certain bouncy country feel I want to achieve and I can't seem to get it right. I can play the right rhythm and yet it still doesn't sound right when I'm playing. It's kind of hard to explain in words hopefully somebody has some suggestions.


   
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Taso
 Taso
(@taso)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 2811
 

I'm not exactly sure what you mean, but changing your tone could help. With my les paul I'd switch it to the bridge pick up for a "twangier" sound (not that LP's get twangy at all, but what can you do)

and then I'd pick very close to the bridge with my picking hand, which also gives a lighter, twangier sound.

I don't play country much at all, but I'd do a lot of open strings, and staccatod kind of notes. This could be the wrong approach.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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dogbite
(@dogbite)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 6348
 

janglely treble helps.
when I play country I also use a swing type rhythm.
ie, hit the bass note then strum the chord. it's a one two kinda thing.
definately avoid the folkie style of strumming. no D/U.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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gnease
(@gnease)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5038
 

Double stops, especially thirds are a nice country addition. There are a lot of common stylistic flourishes related to these, such as bending the lower string of a fourth interval into a minor third or a major third interval.

Other simple, country-style cliches are:

1. The slide, bend or hammer-on from the minor third to the (major) third. This is often done on the I chord.
2. Extending major and minor chords by adding dominant 7ths, 13ths and moving 6ths and 7ths
3. Soloing with the major pentatonic scale
4. Pre-bent releases: pre-bend up a half or whole step, pick the note, then release to unbend pitch. This simulates a slide or steel guitar, and can be used in pre-bending (lower string/note) to a third and releasing to a fourth interval
5. Volume swells, either with footpedal or volume control

-=tension & release=-


   
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Oenyaw
(@oenyaw)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 395
 

Not that I want to condone any bad behavior, but beer always helps when playing country.

Brain-cleansing music for brain-numbing times in a brain dead world
http://www.oenyaw.com


   
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Classico
(@classico)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 65
 

taso is right, i think changing your tone could really help.
try picking at 90 degrees to the string, sharp and clean. and playing near the bridge is a great thing to do...


   
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Evolution
(@evolution)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 150
Topic starter  

I should have probably mentioned I was playing an acoustic so a pick-up switch is out of the question :wink:

Thanks for the suggestions, we have decided to go with another song since I can't seem to get this song, but thanks for all the help none the less :)


   
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