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Hear Strumming Patterns in the Drums

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JBELTON
(@jbelton)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

When listening to music I sometimes hear (or think I do) that the strum pattern can be determined by listening to the drums. Not in all songs but a majority of them. Am I thinking correctly?


   
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brian f
(@brian-f)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 122
 

This is definitely an uneducated answer, but I would think that if the drums play a big part in the rythm of a song, then you can create a strum pattern, designed for a solo guitar, that would encompass the entire rythm (drums and guitar etc.). I like mixing in percussive strums as David Hodge has taught me in several of his lessons. For me, when I listen to a song and I'm trying to figure a strum pattern, I'm not really listening for specific guitar parts as much as I am listening for an overall rythm that I can emulate on one guitar. Not sure if I am making sense here, but I tried.

B


   
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boxboy
(@boxboy)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1221
 

Sure works for me. :)
I double the drums a ton whether I'm playing chords or lead.
With lead/improv type things, nine times out of ten I don't even know I've done it until I listen to the playback: Hey, I'm doubling the drums there!...Mind you, that might also be the reason I'm not much of a lead player...
:D

Don


   
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matteo
(@matteo)
Honorable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 557
 

yes mate

you can do no wrong if you play the drums rhythm with your guitar! The drums give you the rhythm of the song, the rhythm upon which all guitar parts are built, of course, given the fact that expecially on record there are several mixed guitar parts, it is quite rare to listen the guitars playing the same exact rhythm of the drums but it is always a good idea to listen to the drums to have an idea of the general rhythm of the song

If you listen the classic drumming rock beat (1,2,3&,4) you can be sure that the song is built on eight notes so you could play whatever you like until you're playing it with a quaver feel.

cheers

Matteo


   
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StormyMonday
(@stormymonday)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 429
 

I've noticed in a lot of early Santana recordings that when he's playing rhythm he very often uses strumming patterns almost exactly like what pattern the drummer/percussionists is playing. It's almost like he's another percussionist.


   
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