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How To Get Better At String Muting


(@hisnameismatt)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 52
Topic starter  

Hey guys..a lot of songs I like to play involve some form of string muting. Right now, I'm just muting the strings with my picking hand by resting my entire hand on the strings..however...this becomes very difficult when I get further into the song because some of the chords I have trouble forming after the mute..

is there any way I can get better at string muting?

thanks a lot


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(@anonymous)
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Joined: 14 years ago
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i just rest the outer edge or fat part of my palm of my picking hand on the strings for a mute(leaving my fingers in place), or use my fretting hand soft on the fretboard.

i always liked syncopated rhythms, like the bo-diddley beat, which require string muting, but in a way that feels natural... after a little while, muting just becomes a sub-consious thing.


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(@clazon)
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Joined: 15 years ago
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i always liked syncopated rhythms, like the bo-diddley beat, which require string muting, but in a way that feels natural... after a little while, muting just becomes a sub-consious thing.

Amen to that.

As long as you have a good sense of rhythm, you'll be throwing in a load of fret hand mutes into chord progressions before you know it.

Practice, practice, practice here I'm afraid.

"Today is what it means to be young..."

(Radiohead, RHCP, Jimi Hendrix - the big 3)


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 Mike
(@mike)
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I try to mute with my fretting hand as much as I can. It's easier for me. And when I say fretting hand, I mean either of my fingers including my thumb. It depends on the chords.

You have to be able to switch to the chords smoothly before you can mute them. Practice without the mute until you get that right and then bring in the mutes slowly......... baby steps so to speak.

Also, look at the chord. A "D" chord might be tough to mute with your fretting hand because your fingers are all bunched up so, a palm mute may be in order. A "G" chord on the other hand might be easier because your hand is draped over the fret board already.

Like anything with guitar, map it out first, then execute.

Good luck with your temporary problem.


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 Anonymous
(@Anonymous)
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I try to mute with my fretting hand as much as I can. It's easier for me. And when I say fretting hand, I mean either of my fingers including my thumb. It depends on the chords.

The only problem with doing that is that muting with the palm creates a different effect than muting with the left hand. Sometimes you want the "tone" of the chord to "shine" through the mute. When muting with your left hand you don't always get that. I had problems palm muting and I still haven't gotten it totally. It takes practice.


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 Mike
(@mike)
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The only problem with doing that is that muting with the palm creates a different effect than muting with the left hand.

No it absolutely does not. Not if you are comfortable with what you are doing.

I can reproduce the same exact sound weather it be palm or fretting hand.

Form an open C chord and strum........ mute with your pinky........... now with your palm.

Sounds the same doesn't it? If they don't sound the same then you aren't applying equal amounts of pressure. It doesn't take much to stop the movement of a string.


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(@forrok_star)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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It take Practice just like everything else. To become proficient at it you need to be able to use both hands. It is a very important tool to have in your arsenal. what I do is practice complete songs with muting or dampening , first I try to stay in time with the beat of the song, then I move on to creating the effect so it adds a little flare to the song. It's not that I play every beat and/or every note in the song that way. What I do is break it up with rests and chops. And some double stops, then I move onto adding voicings and small lead licks inbetween things.

I know I'm Not the best at explaining what and how I do things its that I've practiced and play them for years. Till the point I can make them talk. And Thats the ticket. make your guitar talk.

Joe


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(@kageman)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1
 

Can someone exactly show a picture of how it is done? I have an electric guitar and just started picking it up (learning how to play that is) and that muting thing is a littl ehard to do , either the vibrations totally stop (no sound) or it doesnt get into the beat/rythm thing. Like i learnt the chords for Oasis's wonderwall and when i try to strum it clean it vibrates a lot...

I hope no one minds my asking for some more light into this matter (keepin in mind that im a total beginner!) :).

thanks.


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(@rparker)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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I don't have a picture, but all's I do is lift up my fretting hand a little bit without clearing the strings. If I'm playing something like an open G chord, then I gotta use the palm and I'm not as good as that as with the fretting hand. I'll leave that explanation to someone who is actually good at it.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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 Anonymous
(@Anonymous)
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I STILL think pal muting has a MUCH different sound than left hand muting. Left hand muting just deadens the strings. Palm muting while holdong a chord such as a power chord STILL sounds like the chord and I can hear that tone as I move the chord up and down the neck. Left hand muting may get a bit higher pitched as it's moved up the neck but all the chords sown the same.


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 Mike
(@mike)
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Mike,

My comments are not about "palm muting", they are about muting WITH your palm.

Two different things........


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 Anonymous
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I try to mute with my fretting hand as much as I can. It's easier for me. And when I say fretting hand, I mean either of my fingers including my thumb. It depends on the chords.

Sorry if I misunderstood you Mike but I take this comment as you are muting with your FRETTING Hand which to ME you are completely UNFRETTING the chord and resting your palm on the strings (if you are indeed talking about palm muting. The way I have ALWAYS read AND interpreted palm muting is that your STRUMMING hand is the source of the mute.

Correct me if I'm wrong? :?

**EDIT**

I know you wrote you're not talking about PALM MUTING which I do agree that they are TWO entirely different things. This conversation is getting a bit confusing and I tink the original poster should clarify WHICH version he wishes to learn? :?

Sorry Mike!


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