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I hate F chords

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(@andtiggertoo)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

Hello...
This is my first post here--I just registered tonight. This is a cool site, by the way!
Anyway... My guitar is a Washburn twelve-string. I started playing about a year ago. I'm a female with small hands, and I tell ya--I still have a lot of trouble with chords like F and B. :(
Am I the only one with this problem?
Any suggestions would be warmly welcomed!!!! :o


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(@rparker)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5492
 

It took me a year to get an F-chord without hospital visits.

Welcome to GN!

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

Welcome to GN, first of all!!!

F and B chords aren't just tricky for those with small hands - I have huge hands, and I had trouble with them to start with. The trick is placement - practise them slowly (say from C to F and back, and maybe from E to B and back. It doesn't matter how slowly you play them, in time speed, strength and muscle memory will build up. Obviously, once you've got them right at a slow speed, try increasing speed....and don't just concentrate on the chords you really have trouble with!!! There are plenty of easy chords as well....

In a few months time you'll be wondering why you ever thought they were tricky - trust me, patience and practise are the magic words!!!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@andtiggertoo)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

Thanks for the welcome! Nice to know it's not just me...for a change. haha...
I haven't been to the E.R. yet, rparker...but sometimes feel like smashin' my guitar!!!! ...But that's just the "little voices"--they talk to me too!
And thanks for the advice Vic. I'll keep at it! You're right...there are a lot of easier chords...but seems every song I really want to learn has to have an F!!!


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

Agh, silly me - only just noticed you mentioned 12-string.....

I'm a relative newcomer to 12-string myself - only had one a few months, hardly played it - but I have noticed, it's harder to play than a 6-string....more effort required to hold 12 strings down, and of course a slightly wider neck....

If you do persevere with said 12-string however, you'll probaby find 6 strings a piece of cake...

(And my excuse is - it's 5am over here.....)

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@andtiggertoo)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

Vic,
Yes...those six extra strings make a huge difference!!!! I have a six-string electric... But, I love the Twelve! Gonna stick to it...I'm a hard-head!
Glad I found a place to find help!


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(@imiron)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 11
 

I hate them f'n Bs and those b'n Fs. :x I'm not that experianced with the guitar yet, and maybe someday I'll get used to them, but it won't be this week. :)


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(@andtiggertoo)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

This post is an accident... It involved two kittens and my keyboard. Sorry! I see that I can't delete it, so... I guess I'll just say, "thanks" again! You know, this is first time I've been to this site, and I can't believe how much info I've gathered tonight. It's total coolness!


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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5899
 

One thing, that may help, is to practice changing to and from the B & F chords. I use a routine, which involves taking the chord, that's a problem, like F and playing that against a whole scale of chords. It's not musical, but it works. Start with an A chord and strum that (try starting around 60bpm). Now, whilst you continue strumming, picture, in your mind, the places your fingers are going to go, to make an F chord. When you have the picture really clear (having a really clear image is the key to this routine), make the change to F. Now think about changing to B (or B7, which is another open chord, like F) - and if you're having any problem with B/B7, go through the same routine as for F and, then make the change. From B/B7, you do exactly the same as from A - get the mental picture of your fingers on the fretboard, fingering an F chord, get it really clear, then change. Next change is to C, then back to F, then D and back to F, E to F, G to F and then back to A.
It is important that you start slow and take all the time you need, to get the picture clear in your mind. You'll quickly get to the point, where you think "F" and the picture is there, along with the knowledge that your fingers know what to do.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

Dont worry i can play them quite easily now ...yet even i hate it too on my classical guitar...

Just hang on..and speaking of playing twelve string..i am sure david is going to advice you better then anyone else.

Welcome to the swarm of musical (and forum) madness ,

Rahul


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(@tim-shull)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 82
 

welcome--this place is like a lighthouse on a foggy night .i have been hackin around on my acoustic for a year now,and can just play F not real fast on the change but clean., B chord no way but iam working on B-7. good luck

Cash is cool


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(@oktay)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 346
 

Or make things easier on yourself for a while and play the easy F chord.

http://8notes.com/guitar_chord_chart/F.asp

8notes is great for learning different shapes for the same chord. Besides, if you play F with only the top 4 strings (Like the 3rd shape on that page) you get a chord shape that you can move anywhere on the fretboard just like a full F barre. (minors of the same shape is super easy too)

oktay


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(@ghost-rider)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 274
 

One thing, that may help, is to practice changing to and from the B & F chords. I use a routine, which involves taking the chord, that's a problem, like F and playing that against a whole scale of chords. It's not musical, but it works. Start with an A chord and strum that (try starting around 60bpm). Now, whilst you continue strumming, picture, in your mind, the places your fingers are going to go, to make an F chord. When you have the picture really clear (having a really clear image is the key to this routine), make the change to F. Now think about changing to B (or B7, which is another open chord, like F) - and if you're having any problem with B/B7, go through the same routine as for F and, then make the change. From B/B7, you do exactly the same as from A - get the mental picture of your fingers on the fretboard, fingering an F chord, get it really clear, then change. Next change is to C, then back to F, then D and back to F, E to F, G to F and then back to A.
It is important that you start slow and take all the time you need, to get the picture clear in your mind. You'll quickly get to the point, where you think "F" and the picture is there, along with the knowledge that your fingers know what to do.

I'm gonna try this. Often, we emphasize the tactile, physical, muscle-memory aspects of guitar playing; and forget the mental imagery, visualization aspect. I guess the more senses we bring to an activity the more effective we will be. In the past, I have just practiced changing from the problematic chord to the next chord in the song....

Thanks,
Ghost Rider 8)

"Colour made the grass less green..." 3000 miles, Tracy Chapman


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(@ghost-rider)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 274
 

Welcome to Guitarnoise! Washburns are excellent quality guitars. I have a 6 string acoustic; and almost bought a 12 string washburn with the best action I have found on any guitar. When I went back to the store, it was gone! Lesson learned...

Thanks,
Ghost Rider 8)

"Colour made the grass less green..." 3000 miles, Tracy Chapman


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(@andtiggertoo)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

Ghost Rider,
Hey, thanks for the welcome. I agree about the visulization of the chords, too... Never though about that much, 'till now... Actually, all the ideas here are a great help to me!! Thanks to everyone!!!! I've been practicing all morning...
...And, yeah...I love my Washburn!!! The sound is incredible...which explains why I'm so determined to play it well. You should go back and have them order one for you!!!! 8)


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