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Jamming?!?!??


(@dudle1977)
New Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

Hi everyone,

I was at Glastonbury in England the other week for the festival. It was amazing. I stumbled across this jamming tent. 4 me this was the highlight of the entire festival. It was incredible. People were just getting up + playing instuments with people theyd never met b4. There was a 8 year old kid playing drums, a 16 year old playing bass + two older blokes playing 6 string guitar - one rhythm + the other Lead.

Can any1 tell me how the hell people can do this. It worked amazingly. I wouldnt even know where to start. Ive been playing guitar for a few years now + never jammed with anyone b4. How do they know what chords (rhythm) and single notes (lead) to play. I assume they must some how know what key they r all in + basically know which notes not to play?

Also when making up riffs from scales eg. say the pentatonic scale if u r in the key of E, the scale chart only shows it covering over 4 frets, so how is it possible for lead guiatrists to step outside of this scale box and the notes do not seem to sound out of key?

Any advice would be amazing. Watching these people jam together was very inspiring + Id love to be able to get up there next year + play with a couple of dudes Id never even met b4.

Thanks,

Andy


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(@kevinbatchelor77)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 75
 

As long as they know what key they are in they will know what chords and notes are available. When you talk about scales and going outside of the box they probably are not. You can play pentatonic scales in multiple locations on the neck and not go out of key the shape will change though. Your scale needs the following notes for pentatonic minor 1, flat 3, 4, 5, flat 7. These notes exist in more places on the neck than one box shape. You might want to look into lead patterns instead of the box shapes. I rarely use the box shapes because you can use the pentatonic lead patterns and cover the majority of the neck and avoid using the pinky finger. This just my opinion though... Many people swear by the box shapes.


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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

It ain't magic. Next time you see that try humming your own melody over it, whatever hits your hit. All those guys do is play that stuff.


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(@crank-n-jam)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1232
 

What they said.

I don't even know my chords, fret board or notes as well as I should. Yet once a week, I jam with a buddy and sometimes buddies. We simply find a drum loop we like, pick a key, then start playing. Usually I'll come up with a simple rhythm part first, then my buddy will simply play lead over it. You'd be surprised how many songs get created this way.

One of the best times (to date) I've had playing guitar was an evening playing with a drummer buddy of mine. It was me on rhythm with guys on lead, drums and keyboard. All we were lacking was a bass and vocals. Regardless, it was a blast! You really should try it some time. Best way to learn, IMO.

Jason

"Rock And Roll Ain't Noise Pollution"


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(@redneckrocker)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 174
 

Do you have any friends that play instruments? Try getting together with them and just trying it. After you get over the initial nervousness, you will have a whole lot of fun. Even if you aren't a really great musician, it is still fun just to play around. I've also learned a lot just watching other people play.

~Mike the Redneck Rocker.

"The only two things in life that make it worth living are guitars that tune good and firm feeling women" - Waylon


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(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

jamming is the best. I jam every friday night and a mates studio. it has been going on for ninteen years. each week a few new players show up. the mix varies from week to week. never stale. it is a great way to learn by doing.
you can make it all up or play a cover with extended riffs.
the most important part of jamming is listening. listen for the main chord or root note. step in and out, letting others have their say (I am speaking in musical terms not oral debates). if someone turns up to step out with a lead don't you turn up. then it all gets loud and he dynamic is lost.
jamming is pure fun as you witnessed.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


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