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Learning the Fretboard?

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 Anonymous
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I posted a question the other day regarding arpeggios. I realized my biggest problem learning arpeggios is that I don't know the fretboard. I remember someone once posted to learn the low E & A strings first and the rest would come easier.

My question is should I learn the #/b's or just the regular notes first? Also, is the best way to learn just picking the note and saying it out loud or are there some tricks to help retention.

Thanks


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 Bish
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Couple of things I can think of.

Learn the dots first. Since you know the E and A string then you also know the High E string. You only need to learn the D G B.

Saying or humming the notes works well either way.

Bish

"I play live as playing dead is harder than it sounds!"


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(@anonymous)
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Remember:

EADGBE - open
GCFA#DG - 3rd fret
ADGCEA - 5th fret
BEADF#B - 7th fret
DGCFAD - 10th fret

...and go from there.

You went to college so you should be able to remember the whole fretboad in a day or two. Just remember back when a professor made you memorize 6 chapters worth of charts and you waited until the night before the test to study them.


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 Anonymous
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Thanks guys...

On a side note...when playing E-shaped barre chords the note on the low E is the name of the chord correct? Also when playing A-shaped barre chords the note on the A string is the name of the barre, right?

Thanks


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(@noteboat)
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Exactly, Mike.

I'm in favor of learning the C major notes - all the sharps and flats are in relation to them. If you learn them in open, then 2nd, then 5th, then 7th position you've got the neck covered - they'll start repeating after that.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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 Anonymous
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Exactly, Mike.

I'm in favor of learning the C major notes - all the sharps and flats are in relation to them. If you learn them in open, then 2nd, then 5th, then 7th position you've got the neck covered - they'll start repeating after that.

Thanks Noteboat...refering to C major you mean in the key of C correct? If so how do I know what key I am in? ( I know I should have learned this a LONG time ago!

Another barre chord question. What about barre chord using the "Am-shape" (E shape moved down one string)...is there a trink to knowing what chord you're playing?

Thanks


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 Anonymous
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Actually Tom you talk about this starting on page 49 of your book, correct?


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 Nils
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Mike, on my web site there is a barre chord chart on the chords page that shows all the common forms and there root note. There is also 2 versions of the fretboard map and a link to a learning tool on the fretboard page.

Nils' Page - Guitar Information and other Stuff
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 Anonymous
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Mike, on my web site there is a barre chord chart on the chords page that shows all the common forms and there root note. There is also 2 versions of the fretboard map and a link to a learning tool on the fretboard page.

Thanks Nils...however I forgot how your barre chart works? If I do the A-shaped barre on the first fret is that an A or A#? Etc?

Thanks


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 Bish
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The A will be on the second fret. Hence open A on the 5th string.

Bish

"I play live as playing dead is harder than it sounds!"


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 Bish
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I'm going out on a limb for me here.

If I play a Gmaj barre chord and then move my "E" fingers (all 3) physically down one string, without changing frets, I'll create a minor chord. However, the chord will change to a Cmin. Then if I "A" finger that same barre chord it becomes a Cmaj. Right, oh ones that know this stuff without thinking about it? :)

Bish

"I play live as playing dead is harder than it sounds!"


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 Nils
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Mike, on my web site there is a barre chord chart on the chords page that shows all the common forms and there root note. There is also 2 versions of the fretboard map and a link to a learning tool on the fretboard page.

Thanks Nils...however I forgot how your barre chart works? If I do the A-shaped barre on the first fret is that an A or A#? Etc?

Thanks
A# just like in the legend. The open 5th is A so one up (fretting first) is #

Nils' Page - Guitar Information and other Stuff
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 Nils
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I'm going out on a limb for me here.

If I play a Gmaj barre chord and then move my "E" fingers (all 3) physically down one string, without changing frets, I'll create a minor chord. However, the chord will change to a Cmin. Then if I "A" finger that same barre chord it becomes a Cmaj. Right, oh ones that know this stuff without thinking about it? :)
Correct.

Nils' Page - Guitar Information and other Stuff
DMusic Samples


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(@tim-shull)
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hey, iam just rookie at this but when i writedown the fret numbers for a new scale i will write the note above it. also sometimes i will use my tuner as iam going up-down the fret board... just my 2cents worth

Cash is cool


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(@niklas)
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You don't have to know the whole fretboard of by heart. You can work out what the notes are just by knowing a couple of things.

The interval between the notes are like this:
EF G A BC D EF...

It's half a step between the E and F and the B and C and a whole between the others.

The open strings are EBGDAE and each fret is half a step. That means that on the E-strings the first fret is a F, third fret will be a G and the fifth an A.

On the A-string the second fret will be a B and then you can work out the rest. To remember which notes only had the half step interval just think of the E- and B-string.

I hope I didn't make any mistakes in my explanation and hope this helps.

Niklas 8)

"Talent is luck. The important thing in life is courage."


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