Close
Skip to content

Forum

Notifications
Clear all

Metronome Question


(@dave-t)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 239
Topic starter  

I am convinced from all the posts on here that I should pick one up. I really would prefer one of theose old wooden tick-tock ones that show up in antique stores on occassion. Can I assume if I find one in working condition it is keeping proper time? I figured I would just set it at a certain BPM then check it against a watch for a minute.

Any rough idea what I would pay for one?

thanks.


Quote
(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

[]

Click here for FREE, limited one-time only offer!


ReplyQuote
(@ldavis04)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 230
 

I have a electronic Korg model that works great....

Annoying gadget that it is.......

I may grow old, but I'll never grow up.


ReplyQuote
(@guitarteacher)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 46
 

I am convinced from all the posts on here that I should pick one up. I really would prefer one of theose old wooden tick-tock ones that show up in antique stores on occassion. Can I assume if I find one in working condition it is keeping proper time? I figured I would just set it at a certain BPM then check it against a watch for a minute.

Any rough idea what I would pay for one?

thanks.

It would be safer to assume it is NOT keeping proper time. Most of the obelisk shaped, wooden metronomes are spring loaded AND mechanical. They may wind down or produce a "lopsided" rhythm. Quartz metronomes are better. Electronic metronomes, better still. Another consideration is whether to choose a periodic (tone producing) or non-periodic (clicking) model. I prefer the latter. In any case, louder is better.

If you want to be good, practice. If you want to be great, you must constantly change the way you think.


ReplyQuote
(@margaret)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1689
 

Dave,

The wooden obelisk metronomes are still available for purchase new. It is important that the slider on the pendulum be set to the prescribed spot when putting it away each time. Apparently, it keeps the pendulum at an even tension while it is being stored. I don't know that I'd buy a used one, since the potential for a bent pendulum is greater.

I have both that style and a small electronic one. The advantage of the wood metronome is that it has a much more "natural" and tolerable sound, in my opinion.

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


ReplyQuote
(@kingpatzer)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2198
 

They also make those oblisk shaped ones with an electrical motor and gearing that provide for a slightly better accuracy than the spring loaded wind-up models.

But any mechanically produced time mechanism isn't going to be as accurate as an electronic one.

When you're talking about the relatively long time frmes of metranomes (we're not talking about 1/100ths of seconds accuracy here) over short durations (a long song is only a few minutes) then being off by a bit isn't something any PERSON will notice.

Still, I'd buy new rather than used just to make sure that the mechanics are in good order and that if there's any problems you can get a refund/exchange.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


ReplyQuote
(@noteboat)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

I agree with Margaret on the 'natural' sound - I use a mechanical metronome for my daily practice.

But they do stray from accurate tempo, particulary as they wind down. One composer (Ligeti, if I remember right) did a piece for 100 mechanical metronomes - all wound up at the start, the interest of the piece comes from the diverging of their beats as time goes by.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


ReplyQuote
(@guitarteacher)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 46
 

The advantage of the wood metronome is that it has a much more "natural" and tolerable sound, in my opinion.

Margaret

That's a non-periodic metronome. The best of both worlds is to get one with a hammer which plugs into a wall socket. I bought one in college a quarter century ago which still clicks through twelve lessons a day.

If you want to be good, practice. If you want to be great, you must constantly change the way you think.


ReplyQuote
(@robbie)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 456
 

I have an antique metronome that I use in my MELLOW periods ( it was in my great uncles estate and it calms me. The sound is not so abrasive, but I also have an electronic one which in my mind keeps a more consistent tempo.
Robbie


ReplyQuote
(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5899
 

The best of both worlds is to get one with a hammer which plugs into a wall socket.
I've never tried plugging a hammer into a wall socket - it sounds dangerous to me. :D

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


ReplyQuote