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Mute E string in A chord?

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(@Anonymous)
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I was just wondering how do you mute the E string when trying to play the A chord. I have been using the "barre" version of the chord


but I always end up playing it...when I try the other fingering I can't get all my fingers between the frets?

Any ideas or is this just "normal"?

Thanks


   
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(@ebuchednezzar)
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Couple of options. For me, I can bring my thumb up around the neck and mute the E. That way works well for the barre version because it gives me some extra leverage to really dig in with the first joint on my index finger. Probably not the best position for my wrist though, but it's workable.

I don't usually play with the three finger version, but if I did, I wouldn't use 123, I'd use 234. Much easier to fit those into the tight space, and it frees up your index finger to mute the E if you so desire. With practice, you'll find you can strum 6, 5, or 4 strings without having to mute anything, unless you're really smacking them. Practice makes perfect.

"There's no easy ways man," he said. "You gotta learn the hard parts for yourself."


   
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(@Anonymous)
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Sorry I should have been clearer...

I meant the HIGH E string....that was my fault...**blush**


   
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(@ebuchednezzar)
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Oh, no problem. But as far as I can tell, you don't have to mute the high E on either version of the chord. You have A, C# and E in the chord. No problem playing the high E there. I suppose you could mute if you wanted the chord to sound a little darker or less pronounced. I can't say I've ever tried that, but if I was going to, I'd just not try as hard to bend my index joint into the barre version. Let it rest on the high E a little.

For the three finger version, it might be easier to try the original way you said, 123 and use the pinky to mute, although that could get crowded. If you use 234, you might be able to situate your pinky in such a way that the meaty part of it mutes high E.

"There's no easy ways man," he said. "You gotta learn the hard parts for yourself."


   
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(@ignar-hillstrom)
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I think he doesnt want it to be muted: Keep your thumb behind the neck, put the fingers straight down.


   
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(@Anonymous)
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Ok..I just noticed in the diagram the author shows both E strings muted...I knew the low E could be muted with the thumb but I had no clue with the High E....I thought it sounded fine when playing...

Thanks


   
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(@ignar-hillstrom)
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Usually you do play the 1st string, no ideawhy this diagram is different.


   
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(@ebuchednezzar)
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My thoughts exactly Arjen.

"There's no easy ways man," he said. "You gotta learn the hard parts for yourself."


   
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(@Anonymous)
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I am not sure...I got the image from cyberfret.com....maybe I should ask on their forum..

Thanks guys


   
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(@pappajohn)
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I play the A chord using three fingers. But, I think what you're saying is when using the barre to play the chord, your index finger is fretting an F# on the high E. In which case, you could use one of the other fingers on your fretting hand to lightly mute the high E string.

-- John

"Hip woman walking on a moving floor, tripping on the escalator.
There's a man in the line and she's blowin' his mind, thinking that he's already made her."

'Coming into Los Angeles' - Arlo Guthrie


   
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(@mikey)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 329
 

You don't need to mute the e string. Just don't play it. You might not think it is possible but it is. It is a matter of hand and pick control that will come over time with practice.

Depending on the circumstances (and how lazying I'm feeling) I will play the open A with 3 fingers, 2 fingers, the 1 finger barre or by using a barre and placing pinky on 5th fret (A)

When I play it with 3 fingers I find that this works best for me and my fat fingers, form it like you would a D7. A reverse triangle of a D.

e--0
B--3
G--1
D--2
A--0
E--x

Stacking 3 fingers in a row like they teach ya never works well enough for me.

Mike

Playing an instrument is good for your soul


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
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The diagram is slightly confusing, but it shows the High String as being played OPEN, not muted.(I'm assuming the X under the O means don't use any fingers)

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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(@pappajohn)
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The diagram is showing two possible fingerings. The first line (x01230) is showing the three-finger version with the A and high E strings played open. The second line (x0111x) is the barre version with both high and low E's either muted or not played.

-- John

"Hip woman walking on a moving floor, tripping on the escalator.
There's a man in the line and she's blowin' his mind, thinking that he's already made her."

'Coming into Los Angeles' - Arlo Guthrie


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
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Thanks for clearing that up PappaJohn.

I do it the barre way, has always worked great for me. And I mute the high E string.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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(@pappajohn)
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Thanks for clearing that up PappaJohn.
Sure thing.

-- John

"Hip woman walking on a moving floor, tripping on the escalator.
There's a man in the line and she's blowin' his mind, thinking that he's already made her."

'Coming into Los Angeles' - Arlo Guthrie


   
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