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Need to overcome a drop in enthusiasm

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(@causnorign)
Honorable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 559
 

Taking a break as others have suggested is a good idea. Playing with others in a jam is also very motivating. How about just noodling around with your guitar, play along to the jingles on tv commercials, play along to songs you like on the radio. How about taking a folding stool and your guitar and going to the local park and playing outside.


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(@pearlthekat)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1472
 

buy a new guitar. that'll get you going!


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(@jimscafe)
Estimable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 119
Topic starter  

Thanks for the encouragement, I knew I could rely on my friends here at guitarnoise...

Like ShadowRaptor I often find the words a let down and think many songs sound better if you don't know the 'real' words.

Strange also that one day your strumming sounds good and the next it sounds awful. I don't just mean the technique but the actual noise the guitar makes even though the setup is identical on both days. Obviously it is something to do with me and not the equipment.

I really did want to learn a piece that sounded very good, and this is something I am finding frustrating too. I think I will just have some fun with the guitar for a few days and if that doesn't work let it rest for a while. I don't think I will buy any more equipment, I need to make what I have already sound good....

One of the things I am trying is to create the intro to Baker Street, the sax bit. I know you can't make it sound like a sax, but I wanted something that would be recognizable and yet still individual - i.e. a guitar interpretation. Difficult as the sax keeps sliding up and down notes all the time.

Maybe I should try something easier for a while too.

Anyway, thanks a lot everyone...


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(@the_fifth_beatle)
Trusted Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 58
 

ive been strumming along at my own pace for a good few years now (did have a spell with a teacher but i didnt practice enough to warrent the fees)...anyways ive gone for months without picking up the guitar but what i find gets me back into it is a bit of inspiration. Try reading a biography of one of your favorite artists, rent a dvd (rolling stones rock n roll circus does it for me!), watch a documentary or even just whack on your favourite album and have a listen.

Ive been through so many peaks and troughs but i always end up picking up the guitar...stick with it!

stop...i have found a genius...stop...


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(@shadowraptor)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 67
 

Hi Jim ...

You and I are the identical place with our playing. I was fooling around with my Beaver Creek traveler last night, and no matter how I tuned the strings, chording sounded horrible. The scales were perfect tho.

I picked up a Korg metronome yesterday. I am finding that when I play certain songs, I am increasing my tempo as the song progresses, and by the end, things don't fit between the music and the words. The guy at the music store told me it would be difficult at first, but to persevere.

I have today off. I retired 3 years ago after being in the life safety field for 35+ years, immediataly got bored, and went back to work half-time as a safety officer for a large school division. Also today I will be putting another payment on my Takamini EG345 12 string. I will be so close to having it paid off that I am hoping to talk the store into letting me take it home!

Have a great day.

Rob
Canada

Have a safe and pleasant day.

Rob
Canada

Yamaha FG-730S
Crafter GAE45/N
Beaver Creek BCR8501
Yamaha CG-? (91)
Yamaha CG-171SF
Framus Texan 5/296 12-String
Takamini EG-345C 12-String
Indiana IN-BM5 Mandolin
M-Audio Oxygen 49 Keyboard


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(@shadowraptor)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 67
 

Hi The Fifth Beatle ...

I have a gazillion DVD's, but my most watched is Sarah McLachlan's "Mirrorball", followed closely by Foo Fighters "Skin & Bones" (acoustic concert).

Rob
The Other Side of the World

Have a safe and pleasant day.

Rob
Canada

Yamaha FG-730S
Crafter GAE45/N
Beaver Creek BCR8501
Yamaha CG-? (91)
Yamaha CG-171SF
Framus Texan 5/296 12-String
Takamini EG-345C 12-String
Indiana IN-BM5 Mandolin
M-Audio Oxygen 49 Keyboard


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(@trguitar)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3711
 

I think all the above advice is good. For me, new gear, DVD's of favorite bands and above all seeing live performances inspires me to get playing again. On occasion I have combined all of these for the ultimate boost in inspiration. Saw Cheap Trick live on Direct TV ... Saw Cheap Trick live at the fair, bought a Hamer guitar and class A tube amp (Epi Valve Special) and got a lot of milage out of that one. A year later time for the next boost? Saw Blue Oyster Cult on Direct TV, saw them live, got new gear. I have to slow up on the new gear though ..... running out of room.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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(@kevinbatchelor77)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 75
 

I feel the same way at times. It takes me a long time to learn a song and very seldom do I get one to sound perfect. For example it took me almost 2 months to learn Sunshine Of Your Love rhythm and lead and it still was not perfect. What I do is take a week break and do something else. For example I have several blues backing tracks that I will practice improv with for a week until I feel like going back to the song.


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(@jbelton)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 16
 

It takes me weeks or months to learn a new song too depending on how hard the song is. I've been learning guitar for three years also so I don't feel so discouraged now. Keep reading post on GN - you'll find your not doing that bad either!! Takes a lot of time, practice and truly being motivated.


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(@kachman)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 155
 

Find some songs that you like and which incorporate some of the things you've learned or are currently learning, and play them with a friend. Make it a fun jam session rather than a "must get it right" practice session. Playing with others and having fun at it is a big enthusiasm booster!

http://www.myspace.com/kachman


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(@demoetc)
Noble Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 2168
 

Hi Jim ...

You and I are the identical place with our playing. I was fooling around with my Beaver Creek traveler last night, and no matter how I tuned the strings, chording sounded horrible. The scales were perfect tho.

I picked up a Korg metronome yesterday. I am finding that when I play certain songs, I am increasing my tempo as the song progresses, and by the end, things don't fit between the music and the words. The guy at the music store told me it would be difficult at first, but to persevere.

I have today off. I retired 3 years ago after being in the life safety field for 35+ years, immediataly got bored, and went back to work half-time as a safety officer for a large school division. Also today I will be putting another payment on my Takamini EG345 12 string. I will be so close to having it paid off that I am hoping to talk the store into letting me take it home!

Have a great day.

Rob
Canada

Ah a 12-string - that should get the juices flowing!

And a Takamine - nice :)


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(@kingpatzer)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2198
 

I'm going to give a slightly different, and late, answer.

It depends on your goals.

If you want to be a musician for a living, or at least work regularly part time -- then the advice given is wrong.

If you want to just be a casual player, then by all means take a break, try something different, etc.

But if you want to be a professional musician, you need to inculcate the discipline and professionalism that is required for you to succeed. A drop in enthusiasm is precisely the time to be even more dilligent in your practicing and to do the things you don't really want to do. Not because it's about fun or enjoyment, but becuase you are a professional striving for excellence.

It's hard.

It's also necessary. Great musicians aren't great by chance. They're the one's who had the dedication and desire that drove them to practice 10 hours a day when they didn't want to.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


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