Skip to content
new strings sound a...
 
Notifications
Clear all

new strings sound and feel TERRIBLE

10 Posts
9 Users
0 Likes
1,430 Views
velsing
(@velsing)
Trusted Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 34
Topic starter  

Hi guys

I had my strings changed today. Moved from 11 gauge to 10 gauge because I thought it would be easier to play and make my guitar sound less loud. The guy at the shop assured me that the guitar would not require a setup from changing the strings, but may just require minor adjustments.

Anyway, I'm playing the guitar now and it feels and sounds completely different from what it was. It suddenly seems like the action is too high and it feels much more difficult to play. It sounds terrible too. I'm getting fret buzz while fingering chords that i could play comfortably before.

Is this normal after changing strings? Do the strings perhaps just need to set a little and maybe i need time to get used to the new feel?...

Or do you guys think I should take the guitar back for some tweaking? Any suggestions would be welcome. I'm so frustrated right now i feel like i should go and buy anoither guitar. :(

Thanks


   
Quote
Musenfreund
(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5108
 

Sounds like you might need a tweak or two. Let them have a look at it.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
ReplyQuote
jackss565
(@jackss565)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 233
 

This has never happened in my limited experiance. Let them have a look at it, that way you'll be sure and won't get dispirited because it doesn't sound good.

Jack


   
ReplyQuote
Hyperborea
(@hyperborea)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 827
 

I'm not sure why it would seem to have a higher action after the string change down. It will have less relief since the lighter strings pull on the neck less and that lets the neck go flatter. If your original relief was low then this straightening might have been enough to start causing fret buzz. It might just need a tweak to the truss rod and maybe a little bit of intonation adjustment.

As said above, take it back to the shop that did it for you and have them look at it.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


   
ReplyQuote
Vic Lewis VL
(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 10264
 

This is a strange one.
It suddenly seems like the action is too high and it feels much more difficult to play.

Lower gauge strings, yet it feels like the action's too high? Maybe they adjusted the action in the shop?
I'm getting fret buzz while fingering chords that i could play comfortably before.

That sounds like the action's been LOWERED, not raised.

Damned if I know what to think, unless by one of those freakish sets of circumstances the guitar's had a knock that's thrown the string relief out of whack - ie raised the treble strings and lowered the bass strings, or vice versa - but that's only going to happen with a one-piece bridge.

Either that, or someone's playing silly games - either way, I'd take it back to the shop, get them to sort it out.

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
ReplyQuote
corbind
(@corbind)
Noble Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 1735
 

Well, from what I remember, the thicker the stings the less splattering movement. Or side to side or up and down. So thick strings can have low action, while thin strings need to have higher action in that they move all over and can cause fret buzz.

"Nothing...can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts."


   
ReplyQuote
Rahul
(@rahul)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2736
 

Get a setup dude. Even the worst guitars can be played.


   
ReplyQuote
Fever and Hum
(@fever-and-hum)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 26
 

This is a strange one.
It suddenly seems like the action is too high and it feels much more difficult to play.

Lower gauge strings, yet it feels like the action's too high? Maybe they adjusted the action in the shop?
I'm getting fret buzz while fingering chords that i could play comfortably before.

That sounds like the action's been LOWERED, not raised.

Damned if I know what to think, unless by one of those freakish sets of circumstances the guitar's had a knock that's thrown the string relief out of whack - ie raised the treble strings and lowered the bass strings, or vice versa - but that's only going to happen with a one-piece bridge.

Either that, or someone's playing silly games - either way, I'd take it back to the shop, get them to sort it out.

:D :D :D

Vic

I agree with Vic. This is really unusual, and unexpected.


   
ReplyQuote
greybeard
(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

In general, truss rods don't straighten or bend a neck - their job is to stop the neck bending beyond the preset point.

If tension is reduced and the neck begins to straighten out, adjusting the truss rod will not have any effect on the neck (unless you abuse it to the point where you have a convex relief) - the rod will just become loose in it's channel and start to buzz when you play. Which may explain your problem. Try tightening the rod by 1/8th turn, no more, and see if the buzzing is reduced or even cured.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
ReplyQuote
jackss565
(@jackss565)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 233
 

Velsing- Have you taken it back to the shop? If so what did they say.

Jack


   
ReplyQuote