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Picking patterns (or lessons to identify patterns!)

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Silent J
(@silent-j)
New Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

Hello, I picked up a book at the store the other day that went as far as to place generic strum and pick patterns on the inside of the front cover. Every song gave both the number of the strum and pick patterns to follow. I thought it was interesting but put it down for 2 reasons.

1. I feel I am becoming more comfortable learning strum patterns on my own. Most of this comes after reading the Beginner Songs page on this site, "For What it's Worth" and "A Horse With No Name". Both lessons, by David Hodge, opened up a door that made me feel confident I could come up with my own patterns, constantly improve and change a song to my own pattern and style of playing, and most importantly I would never be in a rut with a single pattern through the entire song.

2. I already own a fake book with most of these songs in them. I didn't want to buy a second book just because it would allow me to cheat. Not to mention, if there is a method to this madness, even if it's not precise, I would rather learn that.

So, my big question, finally, is whether or not somebody can point me in the right direction to learn how to determine a simple rhythm pattern for picking when playing guitar. A good example of a song I would use this on is "He Stopped Loving Her Today" by George Jones, or "A Love Without End, Amen" by George Strait. Both songs have a rhythm that is being picked out when I listen to it but I have no idea how to determine what it is simply by the music in the fake book.

Silent J


   
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pearlthekat
(@pearlthekat)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1468
 

I'm not sure if I understand your question, but what I do when I want to learn a new song is to listen to it on a CD or to buy it on I-Tunes. From there you should be able to pick up on a strum patten. It may not be exactly what they're playing but you can make one up that works. Once you have a feel for the rthymn you can start playing around with individual strings and come up with a pick pattern that fits with the strum pattern. I do this all the time and turn strum songs into arpeggio songs, if that makes any sense. So basically you need to listen to the song and play along with it.


   
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Clazon
(@clazon)
Honorable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 502
 

Strangely enough. Patterns of arpeggios do exist. However to an extent there are only so many that will be used and beyond that you should be able to pick them out by ear.

For example a typical country pattern is:

-------------------X-----
---------X---------------
--------------X----------
---X---------------------

On which strings can vary. But I'd just say you should find out the chord and pick out the notes. It's not too hard to work them out by ear in most cases.

"Today is what it means to be young..."

(Radiohead, RHCP, Jimi Hendrix - the big 3)


   
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Silent J
(@silent-j)
New Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

Cool, I've picked out that pattern just messing around. After reading some of the lessons on this site about picking out bass lines and fifth's, and percussive strums I was pretty impressed with how much more improved my playing became. I thought there might have been some simple suggestions for picking an arpeggio as well. I'm sure it will come in good time though, and it probably would help if I download a copy of the music I want to play :D Thanks for the advice.

Silent J


   
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