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Picking using the wrist

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(@invictious)
Eminent Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 12
Topic starter  

I am new to the guitar and I recently got a free acoustic guitar, it is Kapok brand

I also have a pick

I got a question about picking

When you pick, do you use only your wrist, or do you use your wrist with your arms

And if you are supposed to pick with only your wrists, how is it possible that you do that, I have been trying for the past few minutes and I still could not do so

And picking with your arm, long term it causes tennis elbow
and perhaps carpal tunnel syndrome

How are they prevented? I mean famous guitarists who practice like 3 hours a day since they were young, yet they still maange to perform without carpal tunnel syndrome or tennis elbow


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

Firstly i want to know how you got that free guitar !

And Well , onto your question so well you should use your wrist while picking.I don't use a pick myself but i when i strum i use my wrist a lot.So if you meant about strumming you should use your wrist on an acoustic guitar.

On an electric they make use of the whole arm most often then not.(as i have seen)

And since you are new to guitar , we are here to help ya

Welcome to GN , the home of musical maniacs :wink:

Rahul


   
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(@davidhodge)
Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 4472
 

Regardless of what you see on concert tapes or music videos (virtually all music video is done for show and should never be taken as a "how to" lesson - it's all about playing to the crowd and not about playing the instrument), you want to use the wrist.

The wrist motion is kind of like saying "no" with a sock puppet, if that helps. Or turning a key in the ignition of your car (or any door) might give you a better idea. When you're doing something like picking individual strings you'll be srprised at how little movement is actually involved. It seems more like your thumb and index finger are moving the wrist instead of it being the other way around. This knowledge again points out that all the arm motion is simply for effect. Folks like Pete Townsend and Chuck Berry knew this way back when.

Another big contributor to guitarists getting tendonitis or Carpal is having the guitar hang down too low on the body when playing while standing. It may look cool but you'd better make it big time or you'll be needing a job with great insurance benefits.

Welcome to GN, by the way and feel free to post any questions you may happen to have. You'll undoubtedly get a lot more answers to this one.

Peace


   
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(@katreich)
Prominent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 686
 

I love the sock puppet analogy!!!! I have a mental picture of a little puppet with a pick in it's mouth.

Falling in love is like learning to play the guitar; first you learn to follow the rules, then you learn to play with your heart.

www.soundclick.com/kathyreichert


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

Another big contributor to guitarists getting tendonitis or Carpal is having the guitar hang down too low on the body when playing while standing. It may look cool but you'd better make it big time or you'll be needing a job with great insurance benefits.

Peace

Now you hit it david.That too right.I have seen lots of guitarist taking it too down low and then bending their backs , trying to play guitar horizontal and what not.

If i ever have an electric , i would always take precautions :!:


   
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(@pvtele)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 477
 

When you're doing something like picking individual strings you'll be srprised at how little movement is actually involved. It seems more like your thumb and index finger are moving the wrist instead of it being the other way around.

That's so true!

Strumming, I find the motion is more of a wrist rotation - the 2 bones in the forearm (radius and ulna) are turning relative to one another in a smooth, fluid action. (Well that's the idea ;-) )

As dhodge says, all these movements are pretty small, especially with single-string picking. Another thing to remember that often catches out beginners is to hold the pick well tucked in between thumb & forefinger. You only need a little point peeking out. Too much and you'll not only lose all freedom of movement, you'll likely lose the pick too - down the soundhole if you're playing an acoustic :?


   
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(@invictious)
Eminent Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 12
Topic starter  

To answer Rahul's question, I nicked it from the school :twisted:
Its in an average condition.

Is there any videos of people playing the guitar? Because when I pick, I rotate the forearm as a whole and it tires me out.

And perhaps a picture of somebody holding a guitar, to make sure I am holding it the right way


   
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