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Pinch Harmonics or Squealies

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(@frank2121)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Whats the story behind these Pinch Harmonics /Squealies how hard are they to do?
do you have to play them on electric ?
I have both acoustic and electric and i cant do them on any :lol:


   
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(@maliciant)
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You will have to have an amp somewhere in the mix, to get that squeeling noise. High gain will make it easier, and some volume helps. It will be easiest at certain points of the guitar (7/8th fret, 12th fret, and I believe the 15th-17th frets tend to be easiest). It might be a little easier to do if instead of putting your fretting fingers right up tot he fret, have them backed off somewhat so that they buzz just a bit seems to help. Then, unfortunately it's practice and more practice. Your pickup's might have an effect on how easily you can get that tone but I'm not sure on that, if you have a tone or overdrive knob crank it up too (when in doubt, crank everything, once you get the sound you want, see what you can turn down). If you can get a 'bell like tone' on your accoustic or your electric without power then you are pretty much doing it right. I'm no expert on this, I spent a long time trying to figure this one out myself and those were my hang ups on it. I'll assume you've read the various descriptions of how to pick the notes (and if not you can find them all of the place, I know I did).


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
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You can do them on acoustics too, but they don't really sound the same at all.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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(@frank2121)
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Topic starter  

it easier, and some volume helps. It will be easiest at certain points of the guitar (7/8th fret, 12th fret, and I believe the 15th-17th frets tend to be easiest). ).

I was under the impression with that you could play Pinch Harmonics any where


   
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(@denny)
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This explains it nicely.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinch_harmonic


   
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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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pinch harmonics as defined by wikpedia sounds about right.
you can make them anywhere.
I discovered them by accident. my pick shifted between my fingers; the side of my thumb and pick were at the same exposure to the string.
plucking the string my thumb and pick hit almost similtaneously. the result was a Billy Gibbons harmonic.
way cool.
now I can play them at will.
however, since I can not play at extreme volumes they end up sounding cool, instead of metalish. works for me since I donrt play metal.

another harmonic that is cool:
play a fretted note. while it is ringing touch the same string 12 frets up. just ever so slightly. you will hear an overtone.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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(@frank2121)
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Topic starter  

nice link Denny
i can now get them but i cant get them to last like while sliding up or down the neck can that be done ?


   
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(@maliciant)
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it easier, and some volume helps. It will be easiest at certain points of the guitar (7/8th fret, 12th fret, and I believe the 15th-17th frets tend to be easiest). ).

I was under the impression with that you could play Pinch Harmonics any where

I said easier, not that they could only be done there. When trying to figure this out finding the easiest places to pull it off helps so that you at least know when you've got the basic concept down, then move on to doing it everywhere else... those sweet spots might differ per guitar but I think that generally they fall in that area.


   
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(@frank2121)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Topic starter  

it easier, and some volume helps. It will be easiest at certain points of the guitar (7/8th fret, 12th fret, and I believe the 15th-17th frets tend to be easiest). ).

I was under the impression with that you could play Pinch Harmonics any where

I said easier, not that they could only be done there. When trying to figure this out finding the easiest places to pull it off helps so that you at least know when you've got the basic concept down, then move on to doing it everywhere else... those sweet spots might differ per guitar but I think that generally they fall in that area.

thankyou for the info Maliciant while playing them can you slide upand down the neck without losing the Harmonics


   
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(@dogbite)
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once you move your finger away from the harmonic point (in pinch harmonics only) does the harmonic end. and rather rudely too.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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(@maliciant)
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I personally don't know how to slide a squealin note around, my theory is that with a whammy bar you could get a similar effect to a slide, or if you slide and pick the next note right it might not be extremely noticable, those blazing fast squealing solo's make it hard for me to tell. Just playin around I can slide about 1 fret lower and not lose the harmonic or 2 - 3 frets higher but every fret I slide sounds loses the harmonic effect, sliding slow or fast seemed to have about the same effect (it was my finger bumping over the frets that was adding energy to the string I think so faster just means you'd hit the fret harder with your finger.... sliding to lower notes lost sustain and volume etc super fast so it seems possible but you'd have to be busy pickin notes as you slide towards your headstock and could be a little lazier and let the notes ring more going away from it).


   
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(@steve-0)
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Just keep practicing, it took me a while to figure out how to do them as well. When playing through an amp make sure you use some gain, and make sure you have a decent amount of mid-range, i've noticed that if your tone has the mids scooped (in other words, bass and treble is high and middle is 0) you'll have a harder time getting the pinch harmonics.

Steve-0


   
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(@trguitar)
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Here is a reply I had to another post a while ago.

I use pinch harmonics ...... you can get a pinch harmonic on any fret.

Pinch harmonics are produced by holding the pick so just the very tip protrudes through your fingers. When you pic the note the meaty part of your thumb touches the string. There are certain nodes where this will work best. To find them, measure 5 frets from the note you are fretting up towards the bridge. Take this distance and measure it up from the bridge towards the neck. This should be where the sweet spot is. For practical purposes though, once you get the picking technique down, don't measure. You will get used to where you need to do this for certain parts of the neck and going by feel is the best. I was doing this way before I knew about the 5 fret formula and was just getting by on happy accidents.

If you want an example of this type of harmonic listen to ZZ Top. I learned this from a Billy Gibbons lesson in Guitar World some time ago. He said he doesn't measure either but rather goes by feel.

P.S. If you want to be technical, this is like a 24th fret harmonic If you have a 24 fret guitar and measure 5 frets from the nut, take that distance and measure up from the bridge you will be on the 24th fret. This is why the 5 fret formula works.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


   
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(@beaner)
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A guy called Justin Sandercoe does a great tutorial on YouTube. I don't have access to it at work, so you will just need to search for him. Or visit http://www.justinguitar.com

Regards,
Paul


   
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(@twistedlefty)
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A guy called Justin Sandercoe does a great tutorial on YouTube. I don't have access to it at work, so you will just need to search for him. Or visit http://www.justinguitar.com

np, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5I5O8P-r5Rk&mode=user&search=

#4491....


   
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