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PLEAZE HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


(@fooj7)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 5
Topic starter  

this may be in the wrong section but ... about a week ago i bought a fairly expensive Gretsch guitar and it had some fret buzz. i took it into the shop and the person said that they would need to adjust the truss rod because the weather we have been having may have warped the neck ... she made it sound like a pretty routine procedure.. so i left it for them to adjust and i guess my question is did i buy a bad guitar or is does this happen to alot of people? and will them adjusting my truss rod hurt my guitar at all? the guitar is a Gretsch Electromatic Projet and it cost aroun $500

Stagg Acoustic
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(@spides)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 157
 

adjusting the truss rod is a very important procedure. I didn't know this till i met a great luthier called rusty rowan, by which time i found out, too late, that my guitar neck had twisted due to poor rod adjustment. This is irreversible damage so now a beautiful acoustic is permanently made bad.

That said it is also a very dangerous procedure, and has to be done right by a professional. You have to remember that it is essentially bending the wood of the neck so the tiniest bit too much and the whole neck could snap off. You definitely need an adjustment, but make sure whoever is doing it is a pro, ask around, see who the top rated luthier is in your area, and get them to do it.

Don't sweat it dude, just play!


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(@rahul)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 2764
 

It isn't a dangerous procedure or something that will make an atomic bomb explode.

With right knowledge, right tools and some patience, you can make all these routine adjustments yourself to your guitar.

And even if you buy a 2500$ Gibson LP, you will still have to make truss rod adjustments due to weather changes or any other reasons.

If the shop is a recognized one, it is more likely than not that they know what they are doing when it comes to truss rod adjustment. So, don't worry that you got a bad guitar. It is in safe hands.


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(@spides)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 157
 

if you know what you are doing yeah but there are some people out there who think they do, and I've seen it happen where necks snap off guitars because of overzealous truss rod adjustments. You don't need to go to the yoda of guitar repairs, but you need somebody reputable ie. not some nobody who happens to be working at the local guitar shop. I perhaps make it sound more serious than it actually is but at the same time it's a matter of a couple of hundredths of an inch, which some just don't have the patience for.

Don't sweat it dude, just play!


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(@rparker)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5492
 

fooj7, although delicate in nature, a truss rod adjustment is nothing to worry about. It's a routine part of a set-up.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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(@twistedlefty)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4166
 

accidents happen when fools start cranking the rods 3 or 4 turns when a 1/4 turn would be too much.
a competent luthier knows this.

i would not worry.

#4491....


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(@chris-c)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3460
 

accidents happen when fools start cranking the rods 3 or 4 turns when a 1/4 turn would be too much.
a competent luthier knows this.

i would not worry.

+1 to that.

The classic amateur mistake is to crank the thing too much and too quickly. Anybody with any experience - or who can read simple instructions - knows that you should do a small adjustment first and then WAIT until the wood has a chance to resettle to the new tension. Then check and repeat if necessary. Unless you get a complete bozo on the job, it should be pretty straightforward.


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

And you ought to read up on it and learn to do that and other guitar setup adjustments yourself. Taking a guitar in to the shop for everything is like leaving your car somewhere for a week or two to have gas put in the tank, IMO. It's not rocket science, nor is it dangerous if you understand the procedure and are reasonable. There are lots of good tutorials online. I usually point folks to Frank Ford's pages at: http://frets.com/

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@spides)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 157
 

accidents happen when fools start cranking the rods 3 or 4 turns when a 1/4 turn would be too much.
a competent luthier knows this.

i would not worry.

I do tend to get a tad animated sometimes. Listen to this guy, he said what i was thinking, but in a far less alarming, and more sensible way.

Don't sweat it dude, just play!


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