Skip to content
Problem with a lot ...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Problem with a lot of songs

47 Posts
12 Users
0 Reactions
3,555 Views
(@slothrob)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 472
 

Depending how often you play the guitar, those strings were probably spent about a month to a month and a half ago.

They're easy to push down because they are a thinner guage than you acoustic strings. On an strat they are probably 9's, switching to 10's might help sustain without affecting difficulty of fretting too much. A long scale neck is better suited to thinner strings though.

The type of string can make a big difference in sustain. Larger strings may sustain longer due to the increased tension. Nickel seem to sustain less. Try D'addario's XL (nickel-steel) for a string that sustains well and is bright enough to sustain on those high notes. Not my personal favorites for what I play, I'm more of a pure nickel kind of guy, but suitable for what you're looking for.


   
ReplyQuote
(@slothrob)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 472
 

One problem with a strat and sustain is that darned vibrato mechanism. Blocking the vibrato can add significantly to sustain with little effort. Possibly making your guitar sustain as long or longer than an LP.
If, like me, you like to use your vibrato bar, try one of these. If you never use the vibrato then you might as well just block the bridge with a piece of wood.

Also, I'm assuming you're using a solid state amp. A tube amp pushed into overdrive will add significantly to sustain due to compression. This may be what you are hearing on recorded songs. You can try to simulate this with a compressor pedal.


   
ReplyQuote
(@exershio)
Active Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 15
Topic starter  

Thanks for all the replie everyone.

1: 45 seconds on your guitar? Sheesh I can barely get 5 before it's faded. O_o

2: I don't have any effects pedals yet, only using distortion which is with my amp.

3: I'm going to try changing my strings now. I have an extra set of strings somewhere in my room, maybe my old strings are just spent. I'll let you all know how it goes afterward.


   
ReplyQuote
(@sin-city-sid)
Prominent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 735
 

What kind of amp?


   
ReplyQuote
(@exershio)
Active Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 15
Topic starter  

The same one that came with the guitar.. Fender Squire SP 10.


   
ReplyQuote
(@sin-city-sid)
Prominent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 735
 

I think you are going to find it's the amp causing this.


   
ReplyQuote
(@exershio)
Active Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 15
Topic starter  

Oh.. Hmm, what kind of amp would you recommend?


   
ReplyQuote
(@sin-city-sid)
Prominent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 735
 

I don't recommend any amp. This would be a tone matter that only you can decide. Stay away from off brands.

I do recommend you take you guitar to someplace with some amps like GC and plug in to them and twang out a few notes. Or, just be honest with the sales guy and tell them you are new at playing and ask him to plug in and play it for you.

The two reason I say this is, one, you get to see if it is a problem with your axe. 2, you get to hear your guitar being played through an amp you may possibly want to buy.


   
ReplyQuote
(@primeta)
Prominent Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 836
 

lol, it's be funny if it's the amp, think I may have to make this the standard first question for anyone playing electric :D

"Things may get a whole lot worse/ Before suddenly falling apart"
Steely Dan
"Look at me coyote, don't let a little road dust put you off" Knopfler


   
ReplyQuote
(@sin-city-sid)
Prominent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 735
 

lol, it's be funny if it's the amp, think I may have to make this the standard first question for anyone playing electric :D

Sure, it could be the guitar but even the worse setup should do better. I have never had a set of strings die in 45 days. Both you and I have given him enough ammo to help diagnose the problem. The only sure fire way to tell is for him to plug into a good amp and listen. We are mearly guessing at what it could be.


   
ReplyQuote
(@exershio)
Active Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 15
Topic starter  

I replaced my strings with new ones. The sustain isn't better, but I like the strings better. =P


   
ReplyQuote
(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

why is it terrible for open chords ?They tend to sound "muddy." But that's mainly because people commonly play them with a good bit of gain. Turn the gain way down and they'll do chords as well as anything.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
ReplyQuote
(@primeta)
Prominent Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 836
 

why is it terrible for open chords ?They tend to sound "muddy." But that's mainly because people commonly play them with a good bit of gain. Turn the gain way down and they'll do chords as well as anything.
:oops: Ah, yep :D But I like having a bit of gain!

"Things may get a whole lot worse/ Before suddenly falling apart"
Steely Dan
"Look at me coyote, don't let a little road dust put you off" Knopfler


   
ReplyQuote
(@slothrob)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 472
 

Try blocking the vibrato, that certainly increases sustain on my Bigsby. Those strings absorb energy.


   
ReplyQuote
(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

Nothing's wrong with "a bit of gain!" But any chords beyond "power chords" will sound muddy if there's much distortion. That's why the jazzers like to play clean, with the tone rather "dark." Not so many frequencies to jumble up together, as well as less clipping generating new ones. Makes their fancy chords stand out better.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
ReplyQuote
Page 3 / 4