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question about chord switching

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maged farid hosny
(@maged-farid-hosny)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Topic starter  

when i switch chords i notice that i lead with my index finger or the finger i focus on, is that normal or should i lead with all fingers at ounce

chuck taylor roks


   
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Mike
 Mike
(@mike)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Yes, it is normal in the beginning, but as you progress you want to place all your fingers down at the same time.

It will help you when you need to switch chords fast.

Good luck and have fun


   
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rag_doll_92
(@rag_doll_92)
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the more you practice, the easier it'll get, trust me I'm learning, my favorite chord progression is e, am, c, g ... :)

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Anonymous
(@anonymous)
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Joined: 15 years ago
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Another thing you can do is look for things in common.
Example C to Am your index finger stays in place and you can also leave your middle finger on the D string. You only have to move the ring finger from the A string to the G string.
Also look for similar shapes, G to C for example. If you use 234 fingering for the G you can move your 2 and 3 fingers over one string and keep the same shape, then all you need to do is plop your index down on the B string as you lift your pinky off of the high E.
Planning your moves ahead and fingering your chords with this in mind will make your chord changes faster and smoother.


   
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Anonymous
(@anonymous)
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This is just me thinking out loud but: could you take chord changes song by song? I mean, do what missleman is suggesting but find voicings that involve the least amount of finger movement to the next chord. Or is that harder than just practicing the most common voicings for each chord?


   
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Anonymous
(@anonymous)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

This is just me thinking out loud but: could you take chord changes song by song? I mean, do what missleman is suggesting but find voicings that involve the least amount of finger movement to the next chord. Or is that harder than just practicing the most common voicings for each chord?
You are absolutely right :D
Common voicings will get you through most songs comfortably and are good to practice them but sometimes an alternate voicing or fingering will help in a given situation.


   
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Anonymous
(@anonymous)
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Joined: 15 years ago
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no, that's a good idea. you should be able to finger chords in whatever manner is easy in whatever situation.


   
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