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Scales and arpeggios


(@jonetoe)
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I want to start getting more into these exercises. When practicing them am I suppose to always keep my fingers down while ascending. In other words no matter what scale or arpeggios....let me use the A major scale ascending, I do not lift my finger off the A note sixth string 5th fret when I put my pinky on the 6th string 7th fret, and so on ascending? I know on the way back you have too lift each finger off or the note won't sound. Its easier to always remove my finger ascending but maybe there's a reason I shouldn't


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 sirN
(@sirn)
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Arpeggios can be a bit different from scales because you may want the note to ring out longer. As for scales, I pretty much take my finger off of each note as soon as the next finger is on the next note. It's been so long now that I don't even think about it.

check out my website for good recording/playing info


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(@jonetoe)
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OK, I was told when I do chromatic scale or finger exercises to leave all 4 fingers down ( I never asked why) I wondered if it was the same with all scales


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 sirN
(@sirn)
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It's been awhile, so I can't speak on what may be thought as proper technique. If you have a guitar instructor, go with his recommendation until you've developed your own playing style.

check out my website for good recording/playing info


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(@jonetoe)
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thank you sir, don't have one someone was just helping me out, but i'm thinking about getting one


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(@bmxdude)
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jonetoe wrote
When practicing them am I suppose to always keep my fingers down while ascending.

Wait, why would you leave were finger on. I'snt it faster to move both at the same time.

"The answer is practice.
Now, what's the question?"
Words by David Mead.


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(@drpool)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Good question, I need to start practicing scales regularly & have wondered the same thing. But I haven't seen a clear answer yet (thickheaded newbie here) As you play the note with the index, does it stay down or is it lifted as the ring or pinky is used on the following note? Or more simply, are succeeding notes played with both fingers or just one?

You're more patient than I deserve. Bless you.


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(@anonymous)
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Alot of beginner books will have you leave all your fingers down until you move to the next string. There is even an exercise were you leave all fingers in place until that finger is needed again. This helps with stretch and teaches you to keep your fingers close to the strings.
It is not the only way to play a scale. It is just to exercise your fingers.
When working on speed I only leave any given finger in place until the next finger is in position at which time I start moving it toward were it is needed next.
Be carefull not to lift a finger too early as that will make your playing sound choppy.


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(@lord_ariez)
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if u want the note to ring leave your finger down, for a more stacatto sound lift it up, all depends on what you want to hear!

'You and I in a little toy shop, bought a bag of balloons with the money we got"

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(@slowfingers)
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Speaking of scales, does anyone practice scales in broken-thirds rather than straight up and down the scale? By broken thirds, this is what I mean:

A regular major scale (C for example) would be:

C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

A Broken Third Scale would be:

C-E-D-F-E-G-F-A-G-B-A-C-B-D-C

OR :

1-3-2-4-3-5-4-6-5-7-6-8-7-9-8

I used to work scales like this on horns when I got bored with playing them straight. It is pretty simple when dealing with the less complex scales (C,F,G, etc.), but gets a bit more confusing when you start playing those with many more sharps or flats in them.

Seagull M6 Gloss


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(@drpool)
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Missile/Lord,

Thanks for clarifying...scales here I come.

don


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(@danlasley)
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Keeping your fingertips near the fretboard is always a good idea, and it makes it easier to learn hammer-ons later. And when you're decending, you want to keep your fingers close, don't lift them too far up.

As for broken 3rds, etc, it's good to vary the patterns. I like what I call the "Chicago" style (after the band):

8-7-6-7-6-5-6-5-4-5-4-3-4-3-2-3-2-1

The patterns don't get more difficult when you change the key, they just move up or down the neck.

I never understand how the sax players do it, as there are no finger patterns, they actually have to learn the notes in every variation of every scale.

-Laz


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 300m
(@300m)
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Intresting question and answer. Gives another beginner here something else to think about.

John M


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