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Should you ever Lubricate your strings ?

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purple
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When changing strings, some people wash the fretboard and then oil it with olive oil. Not sure if that would cause some rusting or build up on the strings. I would look up what to do before using it. It seems from Margaret's unfortunate dog leash story, to only use small amounts. Personally I love olive oil - it is great for your skin, hair, almost anything. You want a great moisturizing treatment mix olive oil and honey and then wash off as you would be rather sticky.

It's not easy being green.... good thing I'm purple.


   
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Vic Lewis VL
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I don't like the idea of moisturising before playing - wouldn't that soften your callouses, leave them prone to peeling off?

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
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Dan T.
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Yes, I am serious about using olive oil. You can also use lemon oil. Here's a thread to check out:
https://www.guitarnoise.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=28354

Dan

"The only way I know that guarantees no mistakes is not to play and that's simply not an option". David Hodge


   
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Number6
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I wash my hands before I play my guitar, but don't expect to need to wash them after, unless I'm preparing food, of course.

I always wash my hands after playing. I can smell the metal on them after playing, and I don't want to develop a nickel allergy. Though I don't know if any nickel oxides are produced on the strings when I play, they're pretty dangerous. I try to get my hands clean as soon as I'm done, just to be safe.

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Moonrider
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I know this sounds strange, but the most effective lubricant I've found is the natural oils your skin generates. Try rubbing your fingertips on the side of your nose or your forehead so the natural oils there rub off on your fingers, then play.

Playing guitar and never playing for others is like studying medicine and never working in a clinic.

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quarterfront
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Somebody told me that Fingerease tends to work better for people with dry skin, Fastfrets better for people with oily skin or people who tend to sweat a lot.

Any truth to this?

I use Fingerease, by the way, and for the record, I sweat a lot in the summer buy my skin is bone dry in the winter.


   
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margaret
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I wash my hands before I play my guitar, but don't expect to need to wash them after, unless I'm preparing food, of course.

I always wash my hands after playing. I can smell the metal on them after playing, and I don't want to develop a nickel allergy. Though I don't know if any nickel oxides are produced on the strings when I play, they're pretty dangerous. I try to get my hands clean as soon as I'm done, just to be safe.
Hadn't thought about that. I do have an allergy to nickel, in earrings at least, so I probably should wash after playing. But then I hadn't noticed a metallic smell on my fingers after playing, and I have a very sensitive nose. The degree of oxidation might differ with the particular strings and individual body chemistry.

Does using oil, whether 3-in-1 or olive oil, (especially when used more frequently than just when changing strings) on a maple (light) fretboard darken it? If so, one would want to be careful to keep the application even along the length.

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


   
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DemoEtc
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Usually maple boards have a clear finish on them so it shouldn't seep in.


   
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Ricochet
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Like Dan T., I use olive oil on my unfinished fretboards and strings. Works great. Don't leave an oil slick on there, you rub it on, let it sit a minute or two, and rub it off. Strings last about twice as long as without it.

Margaret, I use it on leather, too. You don't want to leave puddled up oil on the surface, it'll be greasy, gross and eventually turn to a sticky mess. I did that once with a guitar strap. But I've also got bunches of guitar straps, belts, rifle slings, leather coats and hats that I've oiled with olive oil and not left grossly oily on the surface, and they've stayed in good shape over many years. Makes them nicely water resistant and keeps them supple. They never get sticky, moldy or rancid smelling.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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Dan T.
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Sunflower seed oil, apparently works well. I just ate some potato chips before I played and I was FLYING!

LOL! :lol:

Dan

"The only way I know that guarantees no mistakes is not to play and that's simply not an option". David Hodge


   
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Chris C
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I just read where this guy lubricates his strings ...

I have never heard of this before ...

Any thoughts on this .....

Trevor..... :?:

It's a personal thing and varies from player to player. Some people have naturally oily skin and have to clean a build up of stuff off their strings and neck from time to time, and at the other end of the scale some folks feel that their skin is too dry, or just prefer the feel of a slightly slicker or more slippery set up.

One friend who is quite fussy about his gear told me that he let a mate (who had particularly oil and flaky skin) play his guitar for half an hour and it felt so yukky afterwards that he felt compelled to take the strings off, give the neck a complete clean and fit new strings! :shock:

When I started out (and was a sucker for buying any guitar related accessory that I saw... :roll: ) I bought a bottle of "Kwik Fret - Guitarist's Lubricant and Cleanser". It sounded like just the thing for smartening up dry dirty guitarists... (or maybe I thought it was to use on the groupies?? :? ).

On the back it says:
Play faster and cleaner with Kwik Fret, a blend of premium materials (you can smell the eucalyptus!) designed to aid fretboard speed and increase string life. For best results spray on then lightly polish off with a clean cloth.

So it's apparently a cross between vaseline and underarm deodorant for your guitar. :wink:

I used it once. Didn't notice any benefit so I haven't bothered since. But others swear by various mixtures...


   
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Chris C
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I know this sounds strange, but the most effective lubricant I've found is the natural oils your skin generates. Try rubbing your fingertips on the side of your nose or your forehead so the natural oils there rub off on your fingers, then play.

True. :)

In the days when pipe smoking was more common, it was a popular trick for pipe owners to rub the wooden bowl of the pipe against the side of the nose. Apparently the natural oils there kept the wood in good condition and counteracted the drying effect of the burning tobacco.

No doubt the less lucky among them ended up with either charred noses or zits on their pipes, but I'm told it generally worked very well.


   
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Ricochet
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I used to shine up my pipes with nose oil. But I'm not going to do that with my guitar strings.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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brian f
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I'm going to try the olive oil tonight, but just a little on my finger tips. I'm trying to record some stuff, and every time I slide up/down a fret or two I get this squaking/screeching sound that I'd like to eliminate.


   
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corbind
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I don't know that I could get used to slick strings. All I do is try to keep my hands clean and strings seem to last more that way. And as far as olive oil I'll never have to worry about it because I never have any in the house. :shock: Just mineral oil.

"Nothing...can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts."


   
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