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Slipping Flatpick

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(@brentb)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 20
Topic starter  

I have trouble with my flat picks slipping in my fingers, especially when playing with my acoustic. Any suggestions (other than using finger picking or thum picks) to keep them in my grip?

brent


   
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 KR2
(@kr2)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 2717
 

These picks have a texture to them.
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Snarling-Dogs-Tin-Box-Brain-Picks-103656138-i1123426.gc

It's the rock that gives the stream its music . . . and the stream that gives the rock its roll.


   
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(@wattsiepoops)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 270
 

I answer your question with another question?

How are you holding your pick?

David Watts
Takamine G-Series - £229
Fender STD American Telecaster (Cola Red) - £849
Vox 15watt AMP (Valve pre amp) - £129
Acoustic/Electric Rhythm and Lead (Occasionally) Southport Elim Youth Band
Former Aftershock 24/7 Rhythm Guitarist (Band split)


   
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(@alittlelost)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 10
 

I feel for you Brent...I have the same problem. VERY frustrating. I've tried holding the pick every which way I could think of to no avail. When I try a tighter grip everything else starts going downhill real fast, not that it's a very big hill at this point :mrgreen:

Brian


   
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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

Weeeeelllllll, you could try gorilla snot (yes, really). It's specially for slippy picks.

I would suggest the same resin that gymnasts use, as well.

You could, also, drill indentations into the top part of the pick. They'll stop your fingers slipping.

However, these are all stop-gaps. You'll eventually find that you learn to hold the pick so that it doesn't slip, even without artificial means.
Pick

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
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(@musicismylife)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 15
 

You could, also, drill indentations into the top part of the pick. They'll stop your fingers slipping.
Pick
Or chew the top of the pick... This especially works if you use thin picks.


   
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(@rr191)
Trusted Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 59
 

I have the same problem, especially in the winter when my hands dry out due to the cold winters. I dip my picks in Stick Stuff ( http://stickstuffgrip.com ). This is a coating originally used on drumsticks but they now package it in a small jar for dipping guitar picks. The nice thing about this is that you can use the picks you like -- you don't have to compromise to get a pick you can hold on to.

-- Rob


   
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(@keithkr)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 21
 

As greybeard said, i drill small holes in mine, works for me.


   
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(@wattsiepoops)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 270
 

To my knowledge, the widely taught was to hold your plectrum is thumb on top and next two fingers on the underneath, curling the rest of the hand in on itself. If you are holding it correctly this way, then the slipping should decrease.

David Watts
Takamine G-Series - £229
Fender STD American Telecaster (Cola Red) - £849
Vox 15watt AMP (Valve pre amp) - £129
Acoustic/Electric Rhythm and Lead (Occasionally) Southport Elim Youth Band
Former Aftershock 24/7 Rhythm Guitarist (Band split)


   
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(@alittlelost)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 10
 

To my knowledge, the widely taught was to hold your plectrum is thumb on top and next two fingers on the underneath, curling the rest of the hand in on itself. If you are holding it correctly this way, then the slipping should decrease.

Ahh, I was under the impression you were supposed to use thumb and first finger only. I do get much better control with thumb and next two fingers but, for some reason this would turn out to be a bad habit that bite me in the rear down the road.

Brian


   
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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

The disadvantage of using 2 fingers is that, at some point, you're going to be faced with a song like Proud Mary. The short lead riffs all have note pairs on non-adjoining strings:
|--7--5--3--5--3-- |--2--0--3--5--3--
|----------------- |-----------------
|--7--5--3--5--3-- or |--2--0--3--5--3--
|----------------- |-----------------
|----------------- |-----------------
|----------------- |-----------------

It's easier, for most people to play this with the pick and middle finger. If you use the middle finger on the pick, you're forced to use the ring finger where space is at a premium.

I suspect that one of the common problems is picking too hard, perhaps combined with holding the pick at an angle to the string (i.e. the face of the pick not close to parallel to the string).

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
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 cnev
(@cnev)
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I would take greybeards advice it's all a part of learning and you will at some point stop dropping the pick. I have seen some people play with the three finger method as described by wattsiepoop but they are few and far between and I would hardly doubt that it's taught that way as the preferred method, but at the end of the day if it works for you go for it, it's all about doing what is comfortable for you.

Changing pick thickness (thinner) and using some artificial aids like the Gorilla Snot are all fine for the time being until you learn pick control and then you won't need any of that.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


   
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(@brentb)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 20
Topic starter  

To answer Watt: I hold between thumb and index finger, point of pick at right angles to strings and hand parallel to strings.
Thanks all for great advice, nice to know that I am not along.
brent


   
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 cnev
(@cnev)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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Brent when I started I dropped the pick after about every other strum it was very frustrating and I thought there was something wrong with me. I did start experimenting with thinner and smaller picks and that helped somewhat but I really think it was just more a matter of just playing more and more that got me over it.

I can't even remember the last time I dropped a pick no matter how hard I strum.

You'll get there.

The other thing that happened when I first started was I used to play sitting down for liek the first year and a half and never stood up to play anything. Well the first time I tried that it felt liek I was starting all over again, so my advice would be to stand up and play at least a little bit everyday even it's just to run through scales it'll save you soem aggravation down the road.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


   
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(@wattsiepoops)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 270
 

Hey, just thought i'd clear this up. That's just the way i've been told is the correct way to hold your pick, i actually hold with the thumb and first finger, sometimes even have the first finger curled so its the thumb and first knuckle of my first finger, and i know thats a bad habit, even if it is comfortable, i might as well be learning to play with my toes if i'm worried about technique (Sarcasm for those who missed it)

David Watts
Takamine G-Series - £229
Fender STD American Telecaster (Cola Red) - £849
Vox 15watt AMP (Valve pre amp) - £129
Acoustic/Electric Rhythm and Lead (Occasionally) Southport Elim Youth Band
Former Aftershock 24/7 Rhythm Guitarist (Band split)


   
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